All people requiring support have the right to self

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All people requiring support have the right to self-determination, to make their own decisions, and to act independently, even if their actions involve an element of risk. Legislation relating to dignity of risk includes the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth), and the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cth), among others. Topic 1 -> Section B -> Page 19 Respect of practitioner–client boundaries It is vital to understand the professional boundaries of your role so you have a clear concept of what your role requires and how to interact with the people in your care professionally and ethically. You should be careful at all times not to blur the distinction between being a professional and a friend supporting others. Avoid boundary violations such as lending money, accepting gifts, doing special favours, excessive self-disclosure, social contact, physical contact and romantic involvement. All these actions are unethical and outside the bounds of professional care. Topic 1 -> Section B -> Page 20 Appropriate information management There is federal and state and territory legislation that protects the rights of people receiving support to have their private information kept confidential, and to allow them to access their health and personal information. This includes information kept in a person’s care records and progress notes; personal details shared with you by service users or others; communication from outside stakeholders; and medical information from a doctor. You must adhere to all legislation to ensure legal and ethical compliance regarding information management. Topic 1 -> Section B -> Page 21
Privacy principles There are 13 Australian Privacy Principles (APP) that are requirements when recording or reporting sensitive information. Further details about privacy can be found on the Australian Government Office of the Australian Information Commissioner website here . Collection, use and storage of personal information 1 – Open and transparent management of personal information Ensures that organisations manage personal information in an open and transparent way. 2 – Anonymity and pseudonymity Requires organisations to give individuals the option of not identifying themselves, or of using a pseudonym. Some exceptions apply. 3 – Collection of solicited personal information Outlines when an organisation can collect personal information that is solicited. It applies higher standards to the collection of ‘sensitive’ information. 4 – Dealing with unsolicited personal information Outlines how organisations must deal with unsolicited personal information. 5 – Notification of the collection of personal information Outlines when and in what circumstances an organisation that collects personal information must notify an individual of certain matters.

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