Claiming an identity as the unifier personality

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Claiming an identity as the unifier – personality psychologists try to put it all together.
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Personality vs. Social psychology Sociality vs. individuality (often hard to disentangle) Developmental psychology Personality psychologists focus mainly on the adult years, and on stability Abnormal psychology Vs. “normal functioning” Clinical/counseling psychology
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But before we begin We need to examine some of the core assumptive structures and contexts of personality Next week—evolution: the ultimate context Week 3—social-learning and culture, two second-order macro-contexts
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Your first personality test! We’ll spend a lot of time in this course discussing measurement. So let’s start by measuring you. Sakai Assessments “DAP-DAT Personality Test” No, its not for credit.
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Science or Fiction? Science is not common sense This is especially true for psychological science Each week, I’ll do my best to demonstrate this by bringing in a bit of “popular psychology” Either a counterintuitive research finding (science) or a widespread misconception (fiction).
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Science or Fiction? Consider the following psychological misconceptions examined across various studies, followed by the percentages of North American undergraduates found to hold them: Opposites tend to attract in interpersonal relationships (77%) (McCutcheon, 1991). Most elderly people are lonely and isolated (65%) (Panek, 1982) The polygraph test is an accurate detector of lies (45%) (Taylor & Kowalski, 2003) Schizophrenics have multiple personalities (77%) (Vaughn, 1977) The primary feature of Tourette’s disorder is cursing (65%) (Taylor & Kowalski, 2003) From “Confronting Psychological Misconceptions in the Classroom: Challenges and Rewards” by Scott O. Lilienfeld – APS Observer Vol. 23(7), 2010.
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Next week 1 st half: The methods, philosophy, and principals of (psychological) science 2 nd half: Why we must understand our evolutionary history to pursue a science of personality
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  • Spring '12
  • KenSwan
  • Psychology, Science of Personality

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