picture or were off the side or on the ground or any other place besides on her

Picture or were off the side or on the ground or any

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picture or were off the side or on the ground or any other place besides on her lap, people may get the wrong message that instead of working women are just relaxing and eating rather than the intended message that women are working just as hard as men and are enjoying their well earned lunch break. Aside from the vibrant colors used to create the iconic painting from the 40s, the title of the well recognizable advertisement uses alliteration to generate a crowd of followers in order to promote women in the work field. Not only is the title memorable but the meaning behind it is intriguing. A riveter is a person who operates a rivet gun. Rosie is a typical sweet innocent name for a housewife but the word “Riveter” added to the end adds to the masculinity of the masculinity and meaning of the image in order to provide the message that any woman can
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Funes 5 perform the tasks that used to belong to the men who are traveling across seas in order to protect the country. What may seem to be a just a piece of nostalgia to some and propaganda to others, Rosie the Riveter was an immense piece of work that encouraged women to seek out equal rights in order to prove that they are just as skilled as men and should not be thought lesser of or degraded.
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Funes 6 Works Cited "Active Viewing: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter · HERB: Resources for Teachers." Herb - social history for every classroom . N.p., 2017. Web. 13 Mar. 2017. American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning, “Active Viewing: The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter,” HERB: Resources for Teachers , accessed March 16, 2017 Hoyt, Aliya. "Who was Rosie the Riveter?" HowStuffWorks . Info Space Holdings LLC, 03 Nov. 2008. Web. 16 Mar. 2017. Knight, Marcy. "Rosie the Riveter." The Saturday Evening Post . The Saturday Evening Post, July & Aug. 2013. Web. 16 Mar. 2017. Palmore, Haley. “Beyond Objectification: Norman Rockwell's Depictions of Women for the Saturday Evening Post - Norman Rockwell Museum - The Home for American Illustration.” Norman Rockwell Museum , Norman Rockwell Museum, 1 Mar. 2017,
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