as the arbiter of entre into the secrets of life and death he believes will

As the arbiter of entre into the secrets of life and

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as the arbiter of entre into the secrets of life and death he believes will pour “a torrent of light into our dark world” (54). The statement indicates his disregard for religion and spirituality as irrelevant and as even holding back man’s scientific inquiry in the interests of superstition. It is an attitude often but not always consistent with scientists involved in any controversial study, but particularly in the area of cloning, which mostly closely suits this discussion. Nowhere in the novel does Shelley directly disparage his attempts. She focuses instead on its results and Frankenstein’s personal fears in the face of the reality that he has created a monster. He has failed. Lemberg describes it as “the ultimate act of hubris” that backfires. Wallowing in this fear, never once does Frankenstein mention or address his behavior as unethical. For him it is simply an experiment gone wrong. This self-involvement continues as his only goal seems to be relief from the mental agony of personal failure and the horrifying disappointment, as it were, that his creation did not meet his glorious expectations. (74) His agony from a moral perspective also supersedes that of the unfortunate monster he has created. Lemberg points out, when delving into the science of cloning we are creating life, and “ as individual members of society, we all need to guard against hubris and its consequences.” In this respect, it is interesting to compare Frankenstein’s reasons for wanting to create life with those of current scientists involved in cloning. Lemberg suggests that most today insist their cloning efforts are in the interests of medical advancements. As a creator, Frankenstein crows,

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