9th Amendment The listing of our rights in the constitution shall not be

9th amendment the listing of our rights in the

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9th Amendment: The listing of our rights in the constitution shall not be interpreted to be a complete list --there may be others that are not mentioned that the people have (ex. right to privacy) 10th Amendment: Defines state government (reserved) powers as those powers not given to the national government and not prohibited the states. 13th Amendment: Abolish slavery nationwide. 14th Amendment: Granted blacks citizenship (reversing Plessy v. Ferguson ) and prevents the states from denying a person the due process of law and the equal protection of the law. 15th Amendment: Granted blacks the right to vote. 16th Amendment: Made the federal income tax constitutional (& overturned a U.S. Supreme Court decision) 17th Amendment: Changed the method of selecting U.S. Senators from being chosen by the state legislature to being elected by the voters. 19th Amendment: Gave women the right to vote. 22nd Amendment: Put a two-term limit on the president (or not more than 10 years). 24th Amendment: Banned the use of the poll tax in national elections. 25th Amendment: Provided provisions for filling a vacancy in the vice presidency and provisions if the president becomes "unable to discharge the powers and duties" of the office. 26th Amendment: Lowered the voting age nationwide to 18 years of age. 27th Amendment: A change (an increase or decrease) of congressional pay goes into effect only after the next election for the House of Representatives. How has the amending power been used? To add to national government power: Amendments 13, 16, 18 To subtract or limit national government power: Amendments 11, 21, 27 To expand the electorate and its power: Amendments 15, 17, 19, 23, 24, 26 To reduce the electorate's power: Amendments 22 To limit state power: Amendments 13, 14 To make structural changes in government: Amendments 12, 20, 25
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Federal Government 2305—Unit 2 Lecture Notes Discuss the organization of the U.S. Constitution. Article I- The Legislative branch - It establishes the qualifications, powers - Article 8 (national government powers including the necessary & proper clause), rules, and operating procedures for Congress. The process of how a bill becomes a law is explained. It also included a list of powers prohibited Congress - Article 9 - and the states - Article 10. Also included is a discussion of the impeachment process and the process for punishing or expelling a member of Congress. Article II- The Executive branch - It establishes the rules and operating procedures and the powers of the presidency. Also including the Electoral College and mention of grounds for impeachment. Article III-The Judicial branch- it discusses the powers and structure of the judicial branch. Included here is the full faith and credit clause , the privileges and immunities clause , the process of admitting new states , and federal government guarantees to the states. Article V - This discusses the amendment process. Article VI- Included here is the supremacy clause and a prohibition of any religious test for office. Article VII - The ratification process for the U.S. Constitution is explained in this section.
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