The harder they train relative to their abilities the

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of minimal or no concern. The harder they train relative to their abilities, the more they train, and the more often they have multiple daily sessions, the more athletes need to be concerned with post­training carb timing for best recovery. High glycemic carbs also absorb faster and actually replenish glycogen more completely (even when equated in amount with low­glycemic carbs), so they are even better choices immediately after training. Excessive single­meal carb amounts should be avoided. When a bolus of carbs (especially rapidly digesting ones) much in excess of 4g per lb of body weight is consumed all at once, glucose uptake and glycogen repletion processes can be overwhelmed, and some of those carbs might not be stored as glycogen in muscle but rather converted to fat, which is much less useful for recovery. If you consume a giant carb meal in the morning, no carbs for the rest of the day, train hard at night and go to sleep right after, you’re likely to get suboptimal glycogen repletion. If you cannot eat most of your carbs in the meals after your training, spreading out their consumption evenly throughout the day is the next best option. 69
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Protein Timing Protein must be consumed regularly for best results. If a high amount of protein is taken in at once, only so much of it will be used for recovery and other athletically­interesting processes, while the rest will be burned off as energy. If you eat all of your daily protein in one meal and none at other meals, for example, you risk burning too much of it off as energy and under­feeding the athletically­relevant processes of recovery and muscle growth or maintenance that occur throughout the day and night. There is good scientific backing to suggest that an even split of your daily protein needs should be consumed about 4 to 6 times per day, or roughly 5 hours apart or less between meals. Fat Timing Fat intake should be avoided near the training window. Fats slow down the digestion of carbs. This can limit the amount of post­training carbs that are digested in time to take advantage of increased glycogen replenishment post­training. This can also mean prevention of maximum glycogen replenishment when only short feeding windows are available between training sessions. For this reason, fats should be limited in the post­training window, especially if another training is to occur later that same day. How much do these factors concern athletes that only train once a day and perhaps not for long during that session? Not much. But athletes who train so little probably have few problems recovering in most cases anyway, being that they are likely to be under their Maximum Recoverable Volumes (MRVs). Food Composition While your calories and macros can come from a wide variety of foods, the exact kinds of foods they come from matters to some extent. Food composition is the variable that deals with the kinds of actual foods that comprise a diet, versus just the calories or macros of the eaten foods.
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