I feel very comfortable that we would have won and it would have been a huge

I feel very comfortable that we would have won and it

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knows he had them, as it were, up a tree. “I feel very comfortable that we would have won, and it would have been a huge amount of money,” he said. Doug Wheeler, who was the secretary of California’s Resources Agency under Governor Pete Wilson, agrees. If Hurwitz had won in court, he says, the government’s bill for Headwaters Do we have a moral obligation to save old redwood forests? Can a forest have either moral or legal rights? Does an old- growth forest have value in and of itself, or is its value only a function of human interests? How valuable is a small but endangered species such as the murrelet? An ancient redwood forest has value other than its economic one as potential lumber. Old-growth forests provide the life-sustaining habitat for many species of wildlife, like bats, small and large mammals, and birds. The effects of conservation of legacy trees yield important benefits to vertebrate wildlife associated with biological species. The destruction of old-growth forests will also mean the extinction of wildlife, most of them already endangered today. Aside from the economic value for potential lumber, large tracts of old-growth forests may also be used to address climate change by sequestration of greenhouse gas emissions which makes conservation a key to the overall strategy of stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. There was no union in PL. They didn't need one. They paid better wages than any of the union shops as well
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Case Study -3 8 as providing pensions, health insurance and employee stock plans. PALCO went through the Great Depression without laying off a single worker whilst their soup kitchens fed anyone who turned. Once, Murphy had employed a business adviser. On being told of the efficiency savings he could make he replied " I can't lay off those people. They're all my friends. " Legal protection of the threatened marbled murrelet seabird was upheld this week by a federal appeals court. Despite a 15-year legal battle led by the timber industry to end the Endangered Species Act listing, marbled murrelets retain their threatened status and thereby bring continued regulatory protection to old-growth forests throughout the Pacific Northwest. Marbled murrelets fly up to 50 miles from the Pacific Ocean onto land to nest in ancient forests of California, Oregon, and Washington. Ancient coast redwood forests provide critical nesting habitat for these rare birds at the southern end of their habitat range because old redwood trees have large and broad branches that serve as excellent nesting platforms. Because marbled murrelets are a legally threatened species, logging activities are restricted in areas of redwood forest with known marbled murrelet nesting sites or even potential nest sites. In this way, the Endangered Species Act has helped protect old-growth redwoods since marbled murrelets were listed in 1992.
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  • sequoia, Redwood National and State Parks, Pacific Lumber, Charles Hurwitz

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