she wakes up to the fact that she really is no different from Sula which is

She wakes up to the fact that she really is no

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she wakes up to the fact that she really is no different from Sula which is something Eva has known for a long time. Nel also starts to remember that she did not feel bad about Chicken Little s death: “Why didn t it feel bad when it happened? How come it felt so good to see him fall?” (Morrison 170). Eva even calls Nel “Sula” because for her, the two girls were always the same, they were two parts of one soul. When Nel leaves Eva, she ponders over her conversation the two of them engaged in. Nel finds out the truth about herself and Sula. All that time, Nel has thought that what she has been doing and the way she has been thinking was right but now she knows that it is not the truth; it was not right to reject Sula and to judge her because Sula was her real soul-mate and now she is gone. All those years, Nel was trying to find her 36
happiness in marriage and was trying to live as a respectable citizen, but those were not the things that could make her happy, those were only the things which were expected of her. Nel finally finds the truth about herself and she cries: “I thought I was missing Jude [ . . . ] O Lord, Sula. We was girls together” (Morrison 174). Nel realizes that the friendship she and Sula shared was far more valuable than any other relationship in her life. Toni Morrison creates the failed friendship between Sula and Nel to show the impacts of the social expectations on women s bonding . African American women s familiarity with the mainstream gender roles effects African Americans private lives in the sense that African Americans usually accept these views of a role of a woman. The lives of the women in the novel are largely shaped by men who consequently leave them to improve their own position in the society. Women need the presence of other women to deal with the troubles of their lives, they also need each other ’s protection when the male protection is missing. Women ’s bonds are crucial for women’s survival in the community but the female characters in Sula do not value their friendships with women. Neither Sula’s mother Hannah nor Nel’s mother Helene, for example, have cultivated women’s friendship, Hannah s “friendships with women were [ . . . ] seldom and short-lived” and Helene s friendships with women have always been restricted to sociable and polite conversations (Morrison 44). The mistake the female characters in Sula make is that they submit to the social conditioning of marriage and motherhood and they do not cultivate women ’s bonds. If the women in Sula did not cling on what the society expects from them, they would lead more fulfilling lives. 7. Conclusion 37
The interpersonal relationships among the characters in Toni Morrison’s second novel Sula suggest that African Americans still face many difficulties when trying to assimilate into the American mainstream society. Discrimination of African Americans is still strong which is clearly visible in the denial of job opportunities for African American inhabitants of Medallion. The Bottom’s men’s fears of emasculation and their

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