The content of the document describes the events leading up to the dropping of

The content of the document describes the events

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source. The content of the document describes the events leading up to the dropping of the bombs, during, and after. It includes primary sources of factual reports, short stories, poems and drawings from people that experienced the tragedies in Nagasaki and Hiroshima in the 1940s. The values of this source outweigh the limitations. The book was published 44 years after the bombings, meaning that people that were alive during the tragedies were able to contribute to the book. The authors did not express their opinions on whether or not the dropping of the atomic bombs was justifiable, which shows that the source is factual. When this source was created, the towns of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were still recovering, and still are to this day. From this source, we do not know the point of view of an American that dropped the bomb in one of the aircrafts, or an average American that witnessed the tragedies unfold from home. This book does not give the point of view of people on the opposite side of those affected by the bombings, and what their opinion was on it, making this source biased. 3
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Section 2: Investigation For years, historians have studied the purpose of the atomic bombs used on Japan and why America decided to use them in early August 1945. During World War II, President Harry S. Truman’s main goal was to keep American deaths to a minimum, which he learned from President Roosevelt. 1 In April of 1945, Roosevelt gave his approval of The Manhattan Project – a British-American attempt to beat Germany in a race for the atomic bomb. 2 When Roosevelt passed, Truman was informed of the atomic bombs by the Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson, who was weary of Truman’s opinion on the bomb and what he planned to do with it. Stimson and Truman decided to create a committee of advanced advisers to study the question of whether or not to use the atomic bomb against Japan called the “Interim Committee.” 3 The Interim Committee held a two-day conference to consider how, when, and why the atomic bomb should be used. They discussed whether or not to share the information of the bombs with the Soviets, demonstrating the bomb for foreign observers, and finally, the idea of forewarning the Japanese about the dangers of this new weapon. The main purpose of the bomb was to force the Japanese to surrender during WWII while keeping American losses at a minimum. On June 1 st , they decided to drop the bomb as soon as possible; it should be used on a double target, and should be used without preceding warning. 4 The Frank Report was a document signed by several valuable nuclear physicists recommending that the United States not use the atomic bomb as a weapon to prompt the surrender of Japan in WWII . It explained that the United States would not be able to maintain domination of nuclear weapons for more than a few years, and if the bombs were used, it would destroy the chances of an international arms agreement and 1 Walker, J. Samuel, “Prompt and Utter Destruction: Truman and the Use of Atomic Bombs Against Japan” (2004): 9. Accessed January 9, 2017.
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