William LeoGrande Dean School of public Affairs American University dr Marifeli

William leogrande dean school of public affairs

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hernández president Cuban American National Foundation dr. William LeoGrande Dean, School of public Affairs American University dr. Marifeli pérez- stable Vice president for Democratic Governance inter-American Dialogue Jorge r. piñón Energy Fellow Center for Hemispheric policy University of Miami dr. Archibald ritter Distinguished research professor Emeritus Department of Economics and Norman paterson School of international Affairs Carleton University Andrés rozental Nonresident Senior Fellow, The Brookings institution Former Deputy Foreign Minister of Mexico Carlos saladrigas Co- Chairman Cuba Study Group“CUBA:A New policy of Critical and Constructive Engagement,” pg online @ //um-ef) The April 17, 2009 Summit of the Americas in Trinidad and Tobago provides president Obama with an opportunity to enhance U.S. credibility and leadership in the region by signaling a new direction in U.S.-Cuba policy . rather than continuing to demand preconditions for engaging the Cuban government in the multilateral arena, the president should encourage the Organization of American States and international financial institutions to support Cuba’s integration into their organizations as long as it meets their membership criteria of human rights, democracy, and financial transparency . if Cuba’s leaders know that Cuba can become a full member upon meeting standard requirements, they could have an incentive to carry out difficult reforms that ultimately benefit the Cuban people
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at: Biod adv/add-on Diplomatic engagement is a better internal link– lifting restrictions on diplomats allows for more cooperation on environmental initiatives and treaties – additionally CP allows for more scientific activities to mitigate any environmental issues Economic engagement wrecks Cuban biodiversity Dean, 7 -Science Editor for the NYT (Cornelia, “Conserving Cuba, After the Embargo”, New York Times, 12/25/07, )//TL Through accidents of geography and history, Cuba is a priceless ecological resource. That is why many scientists are so worried about what will become of it after Fidel Castro and his associates leave power and, as is widely anticipated, the American government relaxes or ends its trade embargo. Cuba , by far the region’s largest island, sits at the confluence of the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. Its mountains, forests, swamps, coasts and marine areas are rich in plants and animals, some seen nowhere else. And since the imposition of the embargo in 1962, and especially with the collapse in 1991 of the Soviet Union, its major economic patron, Cuba’s economy has stagnated. Cuba has not been free of development, including Soviet-style top-down agricultural and mining operations and, in recent years, an expansion of tourism. But it also has an abundance of landscapes that elsewhere in the region have been ripped up, paved over, poisoned or otherwise destroyed in the decades since the Cuban revolution , when development has been most intense. Once the embargo ends, the island
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