Jacksons democratic party embraced the ideals of

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from those of John Marshall? Jackson’s democratic party embraced the ideals of limited government. Jackson’s vigorous assertions of executive power caused his political foes to denounce him as a tyrant or would be king, as Jackson was believed by many to overuse his power of veto. Therefore it easy to see Jackson believed the power rested in his hands, the hands of the executive branch, to make and dictate government. Marshall , supported a system of check and balances. Marshall welded the Supreme court into a effective and cohesive whole and with the support of his colleagues on the high bench, the Supreme was able to declare acts of Congress and the president as unconstitutional, struck down laws that infringed on federal prerogatives, and gave force and dignity to the basic guarantees of life and liberty and property. The system of checks and balance was initiated to ensure that one branch of government did not get too much power. You can imagine how this sat with Andrew Jackson, who believed in a strong executive branch, giving him the power to veto almost any act he felt unnecessary. Marshall believed strongly in a strong national government and was willing to do all he could to strengthen federal institutions. Jackson believed, like Jefferson, that the Constitution should be interpreted strictly, so as to reduce rather than expand federal power. Oppositely, Marshall believed that the any law or executive act that violated the terms of the Constitution was a nullity of no force or effect and the it was the duty of the courts to strike down any law that offended the Constitution. Jackson did not question this belief of the authority of the courts to decide whether a law or executive act violated the Constitution, but he believed that the other branches of government also had the duty and a right to decide the constitutional questions. An example of the major conflict is the event of a
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  • Spring '11
  • ?
  • History, Andrew Jackson, Separation of Powers, Supreme Court of the United States, President of the United States

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