Need to bring products to market quickly concurrent

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Need to bring products to market quickly Concurrent Engineering (Simultaneous Engineering ) has been introduced All disciplines are involved with early design stages Increased communication between and within disciplines Tries to optimize elements involved with life cycle Life Cycle Engineering: Considers design, production, distribution, use, disposal/recycling
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Page 1-7 Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) ¾ Computer Aided Design Solid Modeling Illustration and communication Improved Design Easier Modifications ¾ Computer Aided Analysis Stress and strain analysis using finite element modeling and analysis software Dynamics analysis using CAE software Temperature Effects More realistic models can be analyzed ¾ Computer Aided Prototyping Rapid Prototyping Test form, fit (and function) ¾ Computer Aided Manufacturing Programming Computer Numerically Controlled Machines CNC Milling CNC Lathe Programming robots for material handling and assembly Designing tools, dies and fixtures Page 1-8 Optimization and Over Design ¾ Over Deign: Results in too costly products Bulky Parts Materials are too high in quality Precision is higher than needed ¾ Optimization: Iterative design process to improve the objective (improve performance, reduce cost, maximize return on investment) Constraints may include a minimum life Page 1-9 Design for Manufacture, Assembly, Disassembly, and Service ¾ Design for Manufacturing (DFM) Design and manufacturing should be interrelated Design to reduce manufacturing costs ¾ Design for Assembly (DFA) Components should be easy to assemble Easy to grab Easy to fit the proper components with each other to hinder misfit Fasteners, adhesives, welding, soldering, brazing ¾ Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) ¾ Design for Disassembly Components should be able to be removed ¾ Design for Service Reach components easily Page 1-10 Selecting Materials ¾ Type of Materials: Ferrous Metals: Carbon, Alloys, stainless, and tool-and-die steels Nonferrous metals: Aluminum, low-melting alloys, precious metals Plastics: thermoplastics and thermosets Ceramics, glass, graphite, diamond, and diamond-like materials Composite materials (Engineered Materials): reinforced plastics, metal-matrix and ceramic-matrix composites.
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