357 structure means that which is built or constructed 358 tile means a surface

357 structure means that which is built or

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3.57 structure means that which is built or constructed. 3.58 tile means a surface unit, relatively thin in relation to facial area, made from clay, ceramic materials, or other natural or synthetic materials.
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PCTTS 599: 20XX 10 3.59 u nderlayment means one or more layers of felt, sheathing paper, non-bituminous saturated felt, or other approved materials over which a roof covering is applied. 3.60 vapour barrier means a material having a good permeance rating such as foil, plastic sheeting, or insulation facing installed to resist the transmission of water vapour through the exterior building envelope. 3.61 ventilation means the natural or mechanical process of supplying conditioned or unconditioned air to, or removing such air from, any space. 3.62 wall (load bearing) means a) any metal or wood stud that supports more than 1.50 kN/m of vertical load in addition to its own weight; or b) any masonry or concrete wall that supports more than 3 kN/m of vertical load in addition to its own weight. 3.63 wall (non load bearing) means any wall that is not a load-bearing wall.
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PCTTS 599: 20XX 11 4 General requirements for design and construction 4.1 Disaster mitigation measures 4.1.1 Earthquake hazard 4.1.1.1 General Trinidad and Tobago lies in an earthquake zone and has experienced earthquakes of varying intensities in the past, with the consequent damage to buildings. It is therefore essential that buildings are designed and constructed so that they can adequately resist the shaking or lateral forces produced by earthquakes. 4.1.1.2 Effect of soil type The type of soil at the site may have a significant effect upon the ability of the building to withstand an earthquake. However, for buildings within the scope of this Guide, the effect of the soil type is not a major factor provided that the building is not constructed on either of the following: a) loose saturated sands (which can liquefy during an earthquake); or b) loose sand or fill material (which can be compacted during an earthquake). Either of the above conditions can cause damage or collapse. 4.1.1.3 Effect of high seas Buildings on coastal areas may be affected by high waves produced by earthquakes. The siting of such buildings in relation to the sea level should therefore be considered and professional advice sought where necessary. 4.1.1.4 Building shape The ability of a building to withstand earthquake forces is greatly affected by its shape in plan, the way the building is tied together (or detailed), and the quality of construction. Most buildings of rectangular shape, with little or no projections and proper inter-connected cross walls perform well under earthquake conditions, provided that good construction practice is followed. Long narrow buildings should be avoided by limiting the length to three times the width. If the building must be longer, then it should be divided into individual blocks with adequate separation. Figure 4-1 illustrates desirable and undesirable shapes.
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