rules In most cases the parent represents the child and has the authority to

Rules in most cases the parent represents the child

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rules “In most cases, the parent represents the child and has the authority to make health care decisions about the child…” (p. 10). This would be the case with the preschool aged female unless a grandparent, guardian, or other person brought the child to the visit then the APN should be aware of the laws governing their state for minors (Ball et al., 2015).Younger children can be shy, and going to the doctor’s office can be scary and intimidating. If possible, having a pediatric room with colorful pictures, wall art, and childrens’ toys or books can calm the child’s senses. Getting down to the child’s level is suggested by Ball et al. (2015) for communication or even letting the child sit in the arms of the parent can assist the preschooler to feel more comfortable.Lead Poisoning Risk Assessment
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A risk assessment questionnaire to determine lead exposure would be appropriate in the preschool aged child that lives in a rural community. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014) reports children under six years of age are at higher risk. High risk children can have a blood test taken if the risk assessment indicates the need. Young & Nichols (2016) make the alarming point that “Lead can damage growing brains and cause reduced IQs, attention disorders, and other problem
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  • Spring '17
  • Moussa
  • Lead poisoning, ball, Preschool education, Nursery school

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