9 Examples National American Woman Suffrage Association 1890 Womens Christian

9 examples national american woman suffrage

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Examples: National American Woman Suffrage Association (1890), Women’s Christian Temperance Union (1874), Tammany Hall political machine, settlement houses, Jane Addams and Hull House (1889), General Federation of Women’s Clubs (1890) E. Corporations’ need for managers and for male and female clerical workers aswell as increased access to educational institutions, fostered the growth of a distinctive middle class. A growing amount of leisure time also helped expand consumer culture. Examples: Conspicuous consumption, Harvard Annex for women (1879), Bryn Mawr College (1885) ExampleDefinition/DescriptionSignificance to the ThesisHull House A settlement house in the United States that was co-founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr. Located in the Near West Side of Chicago, IllinoisOpened its doors to the recently arrived European immigrants.Women’s Christian Temperance Union An active temperance organization that was among the first organizations of women devoted to social reform with a program that "linked the religious and the secular through concerted and far-reaching reform strategies based on applied Christianity.Influential in the temperance movement, and supported the 18th Amendment.ExampleDefinition/DescriptionSignificance to the ThesisBryn Mawr College A women's liberal arts college in Bryn Mawr, a community in Lower Merion Township, in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania, four miles (6.4 km) west of PhiladelphiaOffered women an opportunity to further their education Harvard Annex for Women A private program for the instruction of women by Harvard faculty, was founded in 1879 after prolonged efforts by women to gain access to Harvard College. For the first time thrown open to the young ladies of America. The wish, so long cherished by mothers and fathers, of giving their daughters the same advantages in the way of instruction as were enjoyed by their sons at the foremost institution of learning on the continent, was at last realized10
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II. Larger numbers of migrants moved to the West in search of land and economic opportunity, frequently provoking competition and violent conflict. A. The building of transcontinental railroads, the discovery of mineral resources, and government policies promoted economic growth and created new communities and centers of commercial activity. Examples:Pacific Railway Acts (1862 to 1866), federal and state government subsidies to transcontinental railroads, cattle trails, cow towns B. In hopes of achieving ideals of self-sufficiency and independence, migrants moved to both rural and boomtown areas of the West for opportunities, such as building the railroads, mining, farming, and ranching. Examples: Silver boom in Tombstone (1877-1890), Abilene, Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West show, Frederic Remington’s paintings, Edward Wheeler’s Deadwood Dick“dime novels”, “range wars” ExampleDefinition/DescriptionSignificance to the ThesisPacific Railway Acts A series of acts of Congress that promoted the construction of a "transcontinental railroad" (the "Pacific Railroad") in the United States through authorizing the issuance of government bonds and the grants of land to railroad companies.
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