Tsutomu ishii peer learning of geometric concepts by

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Tsutomu IshiiPEER LEARNING OF GEOMETRIC CONCEPTS BY PRIMARY SCHOOLLEARNERS IN A HOMEWORK CLUB............................................................4-145Zingiswa JojoSTUDENT TEACHERS’ CORE VALUES: A CASE OF THE MATHEMATICSEDUCATION PROGRAM...................................................................................4-146Weerasuk Kanauan, Maitree Inprasitha, Narumon ChangsriTHE EXTENT TO WHICH MATHEMATICS TEACHERS ENABLE ORCONSTRAIN DEEP CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING..............................4-147Nyameka KangelaTOUCHY FEELY VECTORS - MATERIAL EXPERIENCES OFGEOMETRICAL REPRESENTATIONS OF VECTORS...................................4-148DurgaPrasad Karnam, Harshit Agrawal, Aniket Sule, Sanjay ChandrasekharanELEMENTARY TEACHERS’ LEARNING IN THE CONTEXT OF APROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN RURAL APPALACHIA ... 4-149Shande King, Lynn Liao Hodge, Nick KimTHE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PUPILS’ DRAWINGS FOR SOLVINGWORD PROBLEMS............................................................................................4-150Haruka Kitabori, Hiroko Tsuji
4 - xvVARIATIONS OF UPTAKE RELATED TO TEACHERS’ PARTICIPATIONIN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT..............................................................4-151Karen Koellner, Nanette Seago, Jennifer JacobsEMPIRICAL FRAMEWORK TO ASSESS STUDENTS’ MATHEMATICALEXPLANATIONS: FORMING A MATRIX FOR MATHEMATICALPROOF SKILLS...................................................................................................4-152Yutaka KondoEXAMINING SECONDARY STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT IN LINEAREQUATIONS IN MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS IN MALAWI..................4-153Masato Kosaka, Justus Nkhata, Enoch ChinombaTHREE LEVELS OF SENSE IN INTERPRETATION OF CUMULATIVEGRAPHS...............................................................................................................4-154Ida KuklianskyTEACHERS’ AND STUDENTS’ CONSTRUCTIONS USING TURTLELOGO....................................................................................................................4-155Ruchi S. Kumar, Arati Bapat, Jeenath Rahaman, Arindam BoseCHARACTERISTICS OF BRAIN ACTIVITY IN STUDENTS ALTERNATINGBETWEEN TEACHING AND LEARNING ROLES.........................................4-156Yasufumi Kuroda, Naoko OkamotoOVERCOMING COUNTING IN ZAMBIA: A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OFCHILDREN’S NUMBER RECOGNITION.........................................................4-157Satoshi Kusaka, Nagisa Nakawa, Masato Kosaka, Koji Watanabe,Takuya BabaNAVIGATING STRUCTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ABDUCTIVE ANDDEDUCTIVE REASONING................................................................................4-158Vasiliki LainaWHAT MULTIPLICATIVE SITUATIONS ARE PROPOSED IN BRAZILIANTEXTBOOKS FOR THE FIRST YEARS OF PRIMARY SCHOOL?...............4-159Síntria Lautert, Rute Borba, Alina Spinillo, Juliana Ferreira, ErnaniSantosTEACHING MATHEMATICS IN RURAL APPALACHIA: DILEMMAS ANDRESOURCES........................................................................................................4-160Michael Lawson
4 - xviPEDAGOGICAL DESIGN CAPACITY AND PRESCRIPTION.......................4-161Moneoang LeshotaCOLLABORATION WITHDIRECTED ACTIONSFOR PROOF.....................4-162John D. McGinty, Mitchell J. NathanINFORMAL MATHEMATICAL EDUCATION CONTEXTS TO PREVENTTHE SCHOOL DROP-OUT.................................................................................4-163Maria Mellone, Cristina Sabena, Gemma Carotenuto, Miriana Gagliano,Christian Bisogni, Rosalia Lo SapioCREATIVE MATH ACTIVITIES FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL PUPILS............4-164Christina MisailidouSTUDY ON “FRINGE” OF MATHEMATICAL KNOWLEDGE: FOCUSINGON MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTALITY.................................................4-165Kan MizuguchiONE TEACHER’S TENSIONS IN THE CONTRASTING INTRODUCTIONSTO TWO ALGEBRA TOPICS.............................................................................4-166Vasantha Moodley, Craig PournaraSOLVING WORD PROBLEMS USING VISUALISATION.............................4-167Vimolan MudalyACTIVITIES THAT ENABLE ACCESS TO SCHOOL MATHEMATICS: ANEXPOSITION FROM A MENTORSHIP STUDY..............................................4-168Williams Ndlovu, Willy MwakapendaTHE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DISCOURSE MOVES AND AUTHORITYSTRUCTURES IN MATHEMATICS CLASSROOMS......................................4-169Oi-Lam Ng, Yujing NiTEACHING NUMERACY ACROSS THE CURRICULUM – WHAT

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Term
Spring
Professor
Miss N
Tags
Mathematics education, Psychology of Mathematics Education

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