Psychosocial development has five stages f birth to adolescence The fourth

Psychosocial development has five stages f birth to

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relationships’ (Johnson, 2006; Young, 2007).” Psychosocial development has five stages from birth to adolescence. The fourth stage is Industry versus Inferiority, occurring between ages five and twelve. “It is at this stage that the child’s peer group will gain greater significance and will become a major source of the child’s self-esteem. The child is coping with new learning and social demands. Success leads to a sense of competence, while failure results in feelings of inferiority” (McLeod, 2017). Children are not able to interact with their peer group if they are online.Johnson et al continue “Children who had home computer access had significantly higherscores of cognitive development than did children who did not have home access.” The
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Washburn 9investigators of this report studied 151 Western Canadian children ages six through twelve, and concluded that early computer use at home was a positive influence on young children's cognitive development. They believe that “the more a child uses the Internet, the more he/she reads”. When the visual stimulation is removed and replaced with flat medium such as a textbook, children do not show such excitement. They are asked to read and respond to something static, boring. There is no action, no instant gratification. It may be inferred that the less internet accessibility a child has, the less they will enjoy reading. The addictive connection of ever present technology is not allowing children to delve into lands of imagination when they read a hard copy of a book. If it doesn’t read to children, flash bright vivid pictures, and come with intense sound effects, children will be less engaged. However, those children who have extremely limited exposure to electronic sources of text still find enjoyment from the traditionally printed pages of a bound book.Technology is a tool that is very helpful. However the excessive use of screen time may cause many lasting problems for children and adolescents. It is the responsibility of the adults to set and enforce screen time limits for the children in their presence. Children do not realize how attached to technology they are, until they no longer have it. There is growing evidence that children are not learning intra- or inter-personal skills, struggling in academics, have separation anxiety from their screen, engage in behaviours that put them and others at risk, have lower self esteem and body image, and may be missing out on the world around them. Engaging in more than two hours of non homework related screens is detrimental to children and adolescents.Works Cited
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Washburn 10Adeola, Ruth , and Mallory Gibbons. “Get the Message: Teens and Distracted Driving.” Journal of Trauma Nursing, vol. 20, no. 3, 2013, pp. 146–149. EBSCO Host, doi:.Broemmel, Amy D., et al. “The Impact of Animated Books on the Vocabulary and Language Development of Preschool-Aged Children in Two School Settings.” Early Childhood Research & Practice, vol. 17, no. 1, 01 Mar. 2015.
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