In order to become a APN in the state of Kansas the Nurse Practice Act 2019

In order to become a apn in the state of kansas the

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In order to become a APN in the state of Kansas, the Nurse Practice Act (2019), states that the nurse must successfully complete formal post-baccalaureate nursing education from an accredited and board approved institution of higher learning, hold a license to practice nursing in the state of Kansas, and complete the required clinical experiences that is outlined by the institution in the program curriculum. Kansas does not currently require APN’s to take certification exams. Upon achieving the aforementioned requirements, the nurse may then practice under the collaboration of a physician. The maintenance of one’s licensure is renewed, biennially, with the completion of thirty continuing nursing education (CNE) credits related to advanced nursing practice in addition to paying the required fees for renewal. Personal Assessment Self-assessment is essential to success, especially when taking on a new career. Personal assessment allows the nurse to identify their personality, strengths and weaknesses, and areas of improvement. In this self-assessment, the nurse is able to become organized by setting goals and objectives in one’s career. As with all jobs in the nursing field, APNs are highly sought after, and positions are very competitive. Having a good and organized foundation, that clearly identifies one’s qualifications, capacities for leadership, and multi-tasking capabilities, will make for a marketable APN.
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4 APN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN By utilizing tools, such as Benner’s Novice to Expert Model (2011), as a guide for self- assessment, the nurse is able to identify areas of personal strength that can be used to enhance and improve areas of weakness. The Benner Model is divided into five stages, the first stage is the Novice: “the Novice or beginner has no experience in the situations in which they are expected to perform” (Benner, 2011). The second stage is the Advanced Beginner: “Advanced Beginners demonstrate marginally acceptable performance because the nurse has had prior experience in actual situations” (Benner, 2011). The third stage is Competent: “Competence is demonstrated by the nurse who has been on the job in the same or similar situations for two or three years” (Benner, 2011). The Competent nurse now has a few years of experience in the field and is able to show proficiency, confidence and plan-making in said field. The fourth stage is: Proficient: “The Proficient nurse perceives situations as wholes rather than in terms of chopped up parts or aspects” (Benner, 2011). The Proficient nurse is able to achieve an understanding on the situation as a whole, has learned from previous experiences, and is able to anticipate the intended outcomes and long-term goals of the situation. The fifth, and final stage, is the Expert: “The Expert nurse has an intuitive grasp of each situation and zeroes in on the accurate region of the problem without wasteful consideration of a large range of unfruitful, alternative diagnoses and solutions” (Benner, 2011). The Expert nurse is considered highly proficient and flexible.
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  • Fall '15
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  • Nursing, Advanced practice nurse, Registered nurse, Healthcare occupations, Nursing specialties, APN

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