Thus the lg btq population averages 10 in big cities

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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development
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Chapter 13 / Exercise 03
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development
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Thus, the LG BTQ population averages 10% in big cities and a lot less in small towns. The distribution of LGBTQ populations is not equal even among the largest 10 cities, however. For example, the number of LG BTQ people in San Francisco and New York is much denser than in Dallas. How did LGBTQ people come to live in cities in the first place? During World War II, gay men and lesbian women were mobilized along with millions of other Americans to fight against the enemy. At this time, people generally hid their sexual orientation, but for the first time, many soldiers realized that they were not alone in the world in having same-sex attractions (Berube, 1995). At the end of the war, when they were discharged in big city ports such as New York, San Francisco, Chi- cago, and Miami, many of them never went back to their small hometowns. This core of people formed the basis for LG BTQ communities in these cities (Berube, 1995;
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development
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Chapter 13 / Exercise 03
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development
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HEALTHY Sexuality Being Gay Is Normal In 1957, Dr. Evelyn Hooker, a psychologist at UCLA and a married heterosexual woman, examined the personality tests of 60 individuals; one group was heterosexual and the other homosexual. She had a panel of three distin- guished doctors and researchers analyze the tests with- out knowing the sexual orientation of the subjects. They all declared that in terms of the psychological adjust- ment of these 60 people, they were equal. To her shock, however, when she reported these findings, many of her scientific colleagues did not believe her. Together with psychiatrists and other research- ers, she began new studies that eventually led to the creation of the blue-ribbon taskforce of the National Institute of Mental Health to reconsider all the sci- entific evidence regarding homosexuality as a men- tal disease (Bayer, 1987; Hooker, 1957). As a result of the final recommendations by this taskforce, the American Psychiatric Association declassified homosexuality as a mental disorder in 1 973. At the time, this change was regarded as highly controversial and was opposed by many in society. Three decades later, however, the doctors, such as psychiatrist Robert L. Spitzer, who argued that gay men could be "cured" through treatment, have now found that they were wrong and that sexual orienta- tion cannot be changed. Dr. Spitzer later apologized to homosexual people for how these flawed views harmed LGBTQ people (Carey, 2012). Years later, an award-winning film about Dr. Hooker's work appeared, called Changing Our Minds, which celebrated this landmark in the rights of LGBTQ people and the achievements of the heterosexual psychologists who served as allies in the search for truth and equal treatment for LGBTQ people (http:// 103938/). Today the American Psychological Association also views LGBTQ as nor- mal variations of human development (see APA policy statement: topics/sorientation.html).

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