Stimulant drugs leave children shorter at high doses

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Stimulant drugs leave children shorter at high doses, but this is alleviated with “drug holidays.” Use of stimulants lowers the rate of substance abuse in ADHD than ppl not medicated for ADHD.
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Non-stimulant alternatives (not controlled drugs) (not of them quite as good, but gets close): Wellbutrin (especially ADHD adults) Straterra (atomoxetine) – SNRI – Approved January, 2003 – often as effective as stimulants for ADHD but much less insomnia Provigil / Nuvigil – originally intended to treat narcolepsy and other causes of daytime somnolence, may improve focus in some ADHD – Inattentive patients Sometimes, SSRI’s or Antimanic drugs are helpful ADHD Treatments: Behavioral ADHD Treatments: Behavioral Structuring school and home environments: Consistent daily scheduling Breaking tasks into small chunks Clear immediate rewards and punishments for target behavior Best punishment is time out or withdrawal of privileges; spanking is ineffective and disruptive Minimizing of distractions Ritalin Use on College Campuses Ritalin Use on College Campuses In a 2002 survey of students at the University of Florida, 1.5 percent used Ritalin recreationally in the previous 30 days. In a 2000 survey, 16 percent of students at a small public liberal arts college reported having tried Ritalin recreationally, and 12.7 percent reported having taken it intranasally. A 2000 survey at the University of Pennsylvania found that almost 9 percent of undergraduates had used someone else’s prescription medications, many of which were Ritalin. A 1998 survey of students at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, found that 20 percent of students had illegally taken Ritalin or a similar drug at
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least once in their lives. A 1997 survey of Texas university students concluded that 1.5 percent of students had misused Ritalin during the past year and that 2 percent had done so at some point in their lives. Whereas college students once drank excessive amounts of coffee or took caffeine pills to stay awake while cramming for tests, many now use Ritalin to remain alert. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Ritalin can allow students to stay awake for many hours in a row and maintain abnormally high levels of concentration. Students have used it to cram for as long as a few days. Some students use Ritalin so they can consume more alcohol or mix it with other drugs to prolong partying. Although some students take Ritalin tablets whole, others pursue stronger stimulation by crushing tablets and snorting them. Still others grind the tablets, mix them with water, “cook” them, and inject the mix intravenously.
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