Cromwell alienated supporters with taxes higher than

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 8 pages.

Cromwell alienated supporters with taxes higher than the monarchy’s and with his harsh tactics  against dissent. In 1653, Cromwell abolished the Parliament, naming himself Lord Protector. In  1660, two years after Cromwell’s death, a newly elected Parliament called Charles II to the  throne.  The Glorious Revolution of 1688, pp. 643–644 Although most English welcomed the monarchy back in 1660, many soon came to fear that  Charles II wished to establish absolutism on the French model. In 1670, Charles secretly agreed  to convert to Catholicism in exchange for money from Louis XIV to fight the Dutch. Although  Charles never pronounced himself a Catholic, he did ease restrictions on Catholics and 
Protestant dissenters, thereby coming into conflict with a Parliament intent on supporting the  Church of England. In 1673, Parliament passed the Test Act, which required government officials  to pledge allegiance to the Church of England. In 1678, Parliament tried to deny the throne to any  Roman Catholic because they did not want the king’s brother and heir James, a convert to  Catholicism, to inherit the throne. Charles did not allow this law to pass, splitting Parliament into  two factions: Tories, who supported a strong, hereditary monarchy and the Anglican church; and  Whigs, who supported a strong Parliament and toleration for non-Anglicans. In 1685, James II  became king and pursued absolutist and pro-Catholic policies. When his wife gave birth to a son  that ensured a Catholic heir to the throne, Parliament offered the throne to James's older  Protestant daughter Mary and her husband, the Dutch stadholder William, prince of Orange. In a  "glorious revolution," James fled to France, and William and Mary granted a bill of rights that  confirmed Parliament's rights in government. The propertied classes that controlled Parliament  now focused on consolidating their power and preventing any future popular turmoil. Constitutionalism in the Dutch Republic and the Overseas Colonies When William and Mary came to the throne in England in 1689 the Dutch and English set aside  rivalries that had brought them to war against each other on several previous occasions.  Together they led a coalition that blocked Louis XIV’s efforts to dominate continental Europe and  the two were successful exceptions to absolutism in Europe. Many Dutch and English colonies  developed constitutional governments, while simultaneously enslaving black Africans as a new  labor force.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture