There is a limited amount of research that involves

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there is a limited amount of research that involves the possible effect of explicitly teaching prosody in
the general education classroom (Duncan & Seymour, 2003;Wade-Woolley, 2016;). According to Klee et al, There are hopeful programs that are exploring the use of multiple methods, such as the REWARDS program which “focused specifically on teaching children how to decode these difficult, multi-syllabic words through generalization”. With the REWARDS program, the ultimate goal, is to teach students a “flexible strategy for decoding long words that is both effective and efficient”. The REWARDS program carrys out a mix of both syllabification and morphology due to its ability of breaking apart the syllables with vowel sounds and also uses the affixes and root words to chunk the word. Despite this information, this article was strictly a case study, and was only focused on one student’s experience with the program . To have a more accurate idea of the benefits of the program, further research would be necessary and beneficial in determine the significance and effectiveness of this program with a larger sample of students (Klee, et al., 2015). Conclusion Through out my detailed search of literature on reading multi-syllabic words, it has been found how important it is that teachers need more programs, resources, and strategies to effectively teach these crucial skills. Students need to have the ability to read these challenging, multi-syllabic words in order to read fluently and confidently. Although there are numerous strategies, programs and informative studies about this topic there is no exact best way on how to successfully teach multi-syllabic word reading. The idea of increasing student exposure to multi-syllabic words at a young age is no doubt a beneficial strategy to aid their development, but is also not a stand-alone strategy to successfully and effectively teach students how to read and decode the more challenging, lengthier multi-syllabic words. Teachers and students require resources and tools that they can use to help them decode these words. Syllable awareness and syllabification has also presented effective results, but has but also has gathered a decent amount of criticism due to the ambiguity of syllable boundaries in the English language. Prosody and prosodic awareness has also been proposed as a helpful way of assisting in the teaching of multi-syllabic word reading, but has very little in research and studies and has not been determined thorough enough to be the one instructional strategy for teachers and students. Lastly, there is morphology, which has gathered the strongest defense and reputation holding the most evidence to defend its success in having the best effect on learning multi-syllabic word reading. This strategy not only helps students learn to blend words, but it also helps students learn to comprehend the words by teaching them the meanings of affixes and the root words.

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