making perfume playing hide and seek hunting rrg chariots or holding fishing

Making perfume playing hide and seek hunting rrg

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making perfume, playing hide-and-seek, hunting, - . -r'rg chariots, or holding fishing rods, or are depicted simply entwined with - l1rs as decorative elements in Roman wall paintings, mosaics, and reliefs : =-:re 5.9). These cavorting infant Cupids seem to have little, if any, associa- - ',r'ith their identity as divine figures associated with desire. Ihese changing representations of Eros, then, are not simply aesthetic .:es; rather, they capture different responses to Eros over time. Erotes (or - -:s) as several babies are charming and inconsequentiai; they portray an - -:i of passion in human life that is quite different than that depicted by the 5.I HISTORY LOVE AND STRIFE 217 Eros chases Atalanta. Detoil from o redJigure lekythos. Atiributed io Douris, c. 500 scr. Clevelond Museum of Art, OH, USA / Leonord C. Honno, Jr. Fund / Bridgemon lmoges, cvLt761955.
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5.9 A group ofCupids make perfume. Ploster ond pigment. Detoil from o mythologicol scene on o woll. Circo 50-75 ce. The J. Poul Getty Museum, Molibu CA 72.AG.81. Digitol image courtesy of the Getly's Open Content Program. -* "*i&- - BEFORE YOU READ *-*****4\re 218 al-1,1i'1.:f i .:, APHRODITE, HEPHAESTUS, AND ARES muscular, winged adolescent Eros. Infantilization and pluralization make it difficult to find any trace of Hesiod's elusive and primordial Eros on Roman walls. The diminution of Eros may suggest that less value was placed on human sexuality in Rome, or it may be an attempt to lessen the importance placed on the passions in human 1ife. In either view, the Roman Cupids seem a world apart from the Greek Aphrodite and Eros and the gravely serious'roles they played in the sexual, social, and political institutions, as indicated by Greek myths and rituals. til{ ${B{{-"}\E},J, trCYgg,rur 5: lf.# Ai}$C *#$}gFH' Aphrodite appears as a gloriously powerful and vital goddess in the Homeric hymn in her honor. She seduces the mortal Anchises, conceiving and then giving birth to Aeneas, the legenciary founder of Rome. Aphrodite inspires great desire in Anchises, but also fear; the ta1e, which evokes the limits of human mortality, infuses the hymn with solemnity. Not only will Anchises die, but so too will her son Aeneas. This sobering thought does not detract from the wonder of Aphrodite's visit to Anchises in the hills of Ida. Nor does it detract from the humor generated by Aphrodite's outsized body, her shame at loving a mortal man, and the various ways she tries to hide her own desire. Laughter, beauty, danger, and even sorrow accompany Aphrodite and the desire she inspires wherever she goes. (Translated by Michael Crudden.) . why does Zeus cause Aphrodite to fa1l in love with Anchisesl what are the consequences of her actions?
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5.1 HISTORY: HYMN 5: To ApHRoDtTE what particular moments in Anchises and Aphrodite,s interactions are amusingl How is the laughter (or amusement) these moments create sim- ilar to other instances in which Aphrodite is associated with laugherl How does this hymn represent relationships between gods, goddesses, and mortalsf can you draw any conclusions about wheth", ,rrJ how the gods love human beingsl UNI{NOWN, HYMNS: TO AI}HAODIIfi'(e, 200 rcn}
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