Artwork El Anatsui Old Mans Cloth 006 El Anatsui Old Mans Cloth 2002 Aluminum

Artwork el anatsui old mans cloth 006 el anatsui old

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Artwork: El Anatsui, Old Man’s Cloth0.0.6El Anatsui, Old Man’s Cloth, 2002. Aluminum and copper wire, 15’9” × 17’¾”
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTIONWhere Is Art?Art can be found in many places (e.g. a coffin, a book, contemporary media)Public and private spacesMuseumsCollect, exhibit, preserveOffer educational programs and cultural events
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Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania0.0.7Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania
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Artwork: Rodia, Watts Towers0.0.8 Simon Rodia, Watts Towers, 1921–54. Seventeen mortar-covered steel sculptures with mosaic, 99½’ high at tallest point. 1761–1765 East 107th Street, Los Angeles, California
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTIONArt and CreativityArtists, trained and untrained, share a creative impulsePeople naturally respond to images and seek to express themselves visuallyConsider the role of creativity in your own life
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTION
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTION
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTION
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTION
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTIONWho Makes Art?A single individual or many peopleFamous or anonymousCan be affected by training (or lack of)Master/student, guilds, academiesNaïve or “outsider” artists
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Artwork: Jeff Koons, Rabbit0.0.9Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986. Stainless steel, 41 × 19 × 12”. Edition of 3 and artist’s proof
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Artwork: Tea Bowl0.0.10Tea bowl, 16th century. Stoneware with red glaze (Karatsu ware), 3⅞ × 5”. Indianapolis Museum of Art
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Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn ShieldsINTRODUCTIONTea bowlWestern cultures make a distinction between “high art” and craft In other cultures, importance of various forms of art differedIn Japan, ceramic tea bowls were highly esteemed for their beauty Valued traditional methods
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Artwork: da Vinci, Mona Lisa0.0.11Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa, c. 1503–6. Oil on wood, 30⅜ × 20⅞”. Musée du Louvre, Paris, France
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Artwork: Titian, Isabella d’Este0.0.12Titian, Isabella d’Este, 1536. Oil on canvas, 40¼ × 25¼”.
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