Practice provide opportunities for repetition review

This preview shows page 14 - 16 out of 20 pages.

PracticeProvide opportunities for repetition, review, etc.appear to favor patterns and relationships, so it is helpful for their learning if thepresenter takes time to ensure the meaningfulness of the material.Suggestions:Involve members in the decision as to what they think would be mostmeaningful for them to learn and structure some sessions around their suggestions.Transfer of LearningGagné (1965) described two types of learning transfer: horizontal and vertical.Horizontal transfer occurs when the learner can perform a new task at about thesame level of difficulty as an old task. Vertical transfer takes place when old con-cepts or learning are used to learn or understand more complex concepts.Suggestions:Ask group members to reflect on their inner resources such as persis-tence, their skills and other attributes and characteristics that they can use to makechanges or to reach their goals.Principles of Instruction for Psychoeducational GroupsLearning theories provide a framework for determining principles to guideinstruction for psychoeducational groups. The same principles relate to instruc-tion in more formal settings, but they are used somewhat differently for psycho-educational groups. Knowing how people learn, retain, and transfer material canhelp the leader develop strategies for presenting information in a group.The educational component for most psychoeducational groups is significant;in fact, it is typically emphasized the most. Teaching participants specific informa-tion, strategies, and skills is a primary goal in most groups, so developing instruc-tional strategies to maximize learning is a major task for the leader. Table 4.2
74Structuringpresents the primary principles and leader tasks in psychoeducational groups:goals, readiness, motivation, active versus passive involvement, organization, com-prehension, and practice. Each principle component is also discussed.GoalsThe leader of a psychoeducational group usually develops the goals for the group,particularly for the educational component. These goals should be specific, clear,direct, and unambiguous. They should be developed with the needs, readiness,and motivations of participants in mind. This may be somewhat difficult, as theleader may know little or nothing of the participants as individuals prior to thefirst group meeting. However, the leader will know some general things that canprovide suggestions about the learners’ characteristics. For example, if the group isfocused on time management for engineers, the participants are most likely to becollege educated, and over 21.In addition to developing clear goals, the leader must review these goals withparticipants and get agreement to work toward them. The leader should reviewthe goals with participants at the beginning of the session and ask if they seemappropriate, what changes they might suggest, and if they can agree to worktoward them. For groups with involuntary members, the leader may decide to

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 20 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
Ed Barker
Tags
group leader, Psychoeducational Groups, Instruction Theories

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture