they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown and all political

They are absolved from all allegiance to the british

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they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and . . .all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved . . . And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.—Declaration of Independence, 1776
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Creating a New Government During Wartime - The fighting with Great Britain dragged on for five more years, finally ending in 1781 with the surrender of the British army at Yorktown, Virginia. - During this time, the Continental Congress served as the new nation’s government. - After declaring independence, Congress appointed a committee to prepare a plan of government known as the Articles of Confederation. - With or without a constitution, Congress had a hard time managing the war effort. - Ratification: formal approval of an agreement, treaty, or constitution - Be assured Sir, no occurrence in the course of the War, has given me more painful sensations than your information of there being such ideas existing in the Army . . . banish these thoughts from your mind.—George Washington, 1782 3.4 Putting ideas to work: Framing New Constitution - The Articles of Confederation was only one of many new plans of government drafted during the war. Each of the 13 states also needed a constitution. State Constitution: Giving Power to the People - In framing their new plans of government, state lawmakers demonstrated their commitment to constitutionalism, or the idea that government should be based on an established set of principles. - all state constitutions began with a statement of individual rights. - The governments created under the new state constitutions derived their power from the people. However, they were not completely democratic. - Constitutionalism: the belief that governments should operate according to an agreed set of principles, which are usually spelled out in a written constitution - Majority Rule: the idea that decisions approved by more than half of the people in a group or society will be accepted and observed by all of the people Governing Under the Article of Confederation - The national government created under the Articles of Confederation was much weaker than the governments established in the states. - The government created under the Articles consisted only of a congress, with members chosen by the states. - It had neither an executive to carry out laws nor a judicial branch to settle legal questions. - For the most part, however, the government created by the Articles of Confederation was a failure. - was clear to many of the nation’s leaders that the government formed under the Articles
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was not working. Convening the Constitutional Convention - On May 25, 1787, the Constitutional Convention began.
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