Although this play ends depicting the girl as a

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Although this play ends depicting the girl as a failure, it at least shows that a woman really needs an education and should therefore be entitled to one. The late 1960s and 1970s brought a third female archetype, the “widow.” A woman who is known “for her maturity and emotional depth, the widow is caught at the intersection of two distinct and conflicting legal systems: the traditional Akan matrilineal society and the patrilineal structures inherited from Britain” (276). The typical storyline of a widow Wang 9
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involves a catastrophic monetary loss as a result of the husband’s death. With multiple legal systems in the country’s post-colonial state, law is extremely ambiguous and therefore does not necessitate a widow’s financial insurance for herself and her children. Although the “widow” is not exactly an empowering female role, it explicitly calls for a change in the Ghanaian political structure to ensure that the wife is guaranteed security. This advancement for women in the Ghana Concert Party Theatre and the Yoruba Popular Theatre and their feminist interpretations seem to coincide with progress for women in African academics and politics. Regarding Africa having a slower revolution for women, Takyuwaa Manuh mentions in “Doing Gender Work in Ghana” that “gender studies on the African continent have proven to be less controversial than ‘women’s studies’ or any kind of explicit feminist scholarship because they can have been adapted to state and donor projects that are not aimed at transformation of gender relations and the position of women within African nations.” But even so, feminist improvements have been occurring. In 1977, the Association of African Women for Research and Development (A AWORD) was founded in Dakar, Senegal. Although it is not extremely effective today, it shows a start 10
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for educated women. 14 years later, members of A AWORD began a new movement in Dakar , Senegal called the Council for the Development of Social Science in Africa (CODESRIA). Then, in 1996, the University of Cape Town formed the African Gender Institute (AGI) which Manuh claims “has become the most important site for coordinating, stimulating, disseminating feminist research and teaching in gender studies in Africa” (128). In 2001, AGI initiated the Gender and Women’s Studies for Africa’s Transformation Project (GWS Africa Project) which conduced a survey showing that Nigeria had the second-most gender and women’s studies in its universities, seven out of 40, and Ghana came in third with Cameroon with two universities. Political action for women began taking place in Ghana earlier than gender studies. “In what would be one of the first uses of affirmative action, the Convention People’s Party government passed the Representation of the People (Women Members’) Act of 1960 to allow for the election of ten women members to the National Assembly” (Manuh, 129). 1975 to 1985 marks the United Nations Decade for Women. In 1975 alone, Ghana formulated National Council on Women and Development (NCWD) to encourage gender equality and lessen discrimination. Years later, the “1992 Constitution Wang 11
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