What was the native american power movement like the

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What was the Native American Power movement? Like the many other equality groups, they created the NACA and the AIM which helped Native Americans get the recognition they needed! Because many Native Americans were poor and passed away at early ages How did life change for Native Americans in 1953? Well, they started getting rights like everyone else! They worked to improve their lives, they wanted something, so they fought for that something
What did Native Americans gain through social activism in the 1960s and early 1970s? They gained recognition! The way it was, was kind of like dirt swept under a rug, the United States didn’t even think about it, they just went on! So, when the Native Americans started fighting for their freedoms (Through social activism) they started getting it, like the rug was picked up. People Gray Panthers (Who were they and what did they fight for?) National Organization for Women (NOW) (What were their goals?) Betty Friedan Phyllis Schlafly Cesar Chavez Events (Describe the event, its causes and effects) Civil Rights Act of 1964 (How did it affect different minority groups?) 1961 - President's Commission on the Status of Women Title IX was passed Roe v. Wade Delano Grape Strike 1972 march called the "Trail of Broken Treaties" Vocabulary (fill in effects from the lesson where possible or put the definition in your own words) Feminism – belief in the need to secure and protect rights and opportunities for women equal to those of men 7.04: Civil Rights Decisions: The Big Ideas What happened in Plessy v. Ferguson? How did Brown II affect the ruling in Brown v. Board of Education? How was the NAACP involved in What is affirmative action? How did suspects’ rights change with these court decisions? People “Warren Court” (How is it related to the term “activist”?)
Supreme Court Cases Case Issue Resolution Brown v. Board of Education (1954) Green v. County School Board of New Kent County (1968) Swann v. Charlotte- Mecklenburg (1971) Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978) Miranda v. Arizona (1966) Gideon v. Wainwright (1963) Mapp v. Ohio (1961) Griswold v. Connecticut (1965) Roe v. Wade (1973) Vocabulary (fill in effects from the lesson where possible or put the definition in your own words) Affirmative action – the efforts, usually through law, to improve opportunities for disadvantaged groups in education, employment, and other areas Precedent – a court action or decision used as a reference in later cases

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