The categories I will describe below emerge from that narrative analysis I am

The categories i will describe below emerge from that

This preview shows page 11 - 12 out of 27 pages.

washing I examine. The categories I will describe below emerge from that narrative analysis. I am planning a more quantitative analysis in my future research, however, which includes as noted above an expanded variety of food companies and a much greater number of cases. Although numerous themes exist, I will focus on hunger to contrast impression management regarding the responsibility agribusiness claims for feeding the planet with the contradictions that the world food system presents for hunger and the en- vironment. The methods in this article fit within a tradition in the social sciences of examining the forms and influences of advertising on a variety of fronts, including children, gender and race inequality, and health, among others (Goffman, 1979; Roy, 1998; Frith et al., 2004; Stone, 2007; Calvert, 2008) as well the usefulness of analys - ing corporate sustainability reports in research (Feller, 2004). As to the environment and food specifically, Sturgeon (2009) discusses the significance of advertising for framing the perception of nature and the meaning for environmentalism and how the public responds to those messages, while Corbett (2002) looks at growth in the ‘greening’ of advertising practices, speaking to the commoditization of nature. In another example, exploring company ‘greenness’, Grillo et al. (2008) examine ad - vertising in the forestry industry, reinforcing the importance of corporate environ - mental communication and stewardship – especially for industries impacting nature directly such as agriculture, mining, or forestry. I will extend arguments to hunger and food, noting that advertising not only manages corporate image but can also shape consumer and government responses and discussions of food security. Global agribusiness seeks to win what Gronski and Glenna (2009, pp. 130–131) emphasize as ‘dueling visions for producing food: glob - al, high-tech, and profit-driven versus localized and people-centered.’ Championing a more critical perspective, the latter approach tends toward the concept of ‘food jus - tice’ (Gottlieb and Joshi, 2010; Alkon and Agyman, 2011), which seeks to build a bet - ter, more sustainable food system developed from the bottom up. Through academic research, the social sciences can also influence public debate, framing the question of food security with an alternative vision as to its roots and public perception (Rivera- Ferre, 2011) This is central to the findings and discussion that follow. Findings and Discussion Flaunting slogans like ADM’s ‘Resourceful by Nature’, Cargill’s ‘Nourishing Ideas, Nourishing People’ or ConAgra’s ‘Good for You, Good for the Community, Good for the Planet’, agribusiness has defined the political economy of food in its interest while seeking to appear as good citizens. Ultimately pursuing profits and corporate sustainability, agribusiness exemplifies global interconnectedness and power. Grain - washing reinforces the dynamic of marketing scientific solutions to hunger – ped - dling CSR versus the realities of maintaining a destructive global food economy laden with harmful inputs and unequal distribution systems and outcomes. I will
Image of page 11
Image of page 12

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 27 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes