Only the clavicle attaches to the axial skeleton the

This preview shows page 22 - 24 out of 24 pages.

Only the clavicle attaches to the axial skeleton, the scapula can move freely across the thorax, allowing the arm to move freely with it - The socket of the shoulder joint is shallow and poorly reinforced so it does not restrict the movement of the humerus - The curves in the clavicle ensure that it fractures anteriorly. If it fractured inwards the pieced could pierce the subclavian artery Carpus (wrist) bones: - Scaphoid - Lunate These four form the proximal row - Triquetrum ** all but the pisiform participates in forming the wrist joint - Pisiform - Trapezium - Trapezoid These four form the distal row - Capitate - Hamate S ally L eft T he P arty T o T ake C indy H ome - 5 metacarpals (the palm) - Pelvic girdle is attached to the thoracic cage - The pelvic girdle lacks mobility but the pectoral girdle is far more stable - The female pelvis is modified for childbearing – wider and shallower, rounder - The neck is the weakest part of the femur and is often be fractured (broken hip) - The fibula does not bear weight but several muscles originate from it - The foot acts as a leaver to propel the body forward - Metatarsus consists of 5 bones’ - The first metatarsus is short and thick - The great toe only has two phalanges - Frontal sinuses: Lateral to the gabella - Maxillary sinuses: The largest of the parasinuses. Extend from the orbits to the roots of the upper teeth
JOINTS – WORDS TO KNOW - Synostoses : Closed sutures – held together by small interconnecting fibers - Syndesmoses : Bones that are connected only by ligaments - Gomphosis : peg-in-socket fibrous joint - Syn-chondrosis : where a bar/plate of hyaline cartilage connects two bones - Symphysis : a joint where the bones are connected via fibrocartilage - Articular Cartilage : Glassy smooth hyaline cartilage covers the opposing bone surfaces – absorb compression and stop it from being crushed - Joint cavity : Only in synoval joints – a space that contains synoval fluid - Articular capsule : Encloses the joint cavity - Fibrous layer : Composed of dense irregular CT – continuous with the periostea of the articulating bones - Synovial membrane : composed of loose CT – covers all internal joint surfaces that are not hyaline cartilage – makes synovial fluid - Synovial fluid : From the filtration from blood flowing through the capillaries in the synovial membrane – slippery, weight bearing and reduces friction - Weeping lubrication : Lubricates the free surfaces of the cartilages and nourishes their cells - Capsular ligaments : thicked parts of the fibrous lauer - Extracapsular ligaments : found outside the capsul (usually) - Intracapsular ligaments : inside - Bursae: flattened fibrous sacs lines with synovial membrane and contains a thin film of synovial fluid – occur where stuff rub together - Tendon Sheath : an elongated bursae that wraps completely around a tendon subjected to friction – common where tendons are crowded together - Muscle tone: low levels of contractile activity in relaxed muscles that keep the muscles healthy and ready to react - Origin: a=part of the muscle attached to immovable bone -

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture