People who are objects of prejudice and discrimination do not respond passively

People who are objects of prejudice and

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*People who are objects of prejudice and discrimination do not respond passively* 6.7.5 The Civil Rights Movement in the US - After slavery was abolished in the US, a state-sanctioned system of racial discrimination known as Jim Crow was put into place - Under Jim Crow laws, blacks and other minorities were denied the right to vote and sit on juries; subjected to racial segregation; disadvantaged with regard to employment opportunities; and subjected to widespread, systematic discrimination, including violence against person and property 35
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- In many states, whites and non-whites were denied the right to marry - The civil rights movement was a response to such systematic discrimination, not just in the South but also across the nation - Demanding integrated schools, decent housing, and an end to racial bias - Confronted institutional discrimination as embodied in local, state, and federal agencies; judicial systems; and legislative bodies, including police, the National Guards, judges and all-white citizens’ town - Black churches play a key role: served as a community clearinghouse, a credit union, a support group, and center of political activism. They were the context for the emergence of key civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr and the emergence of key organization such as the Southern Christian Leadership Conference - Selma to Montgomery March - State and local law enforcement agents stopped 600 demonstrators six blocks into the march and attacked them with clubs and tear gas - Event was televised and what the Americans saw created enough outrage to lend national support to the movement - Civil rights leaders sought protection from the courts to march and it was granted - Escalating intensity of this movement pushed the federal government to become involved - President John F. Kennedy used the power of his office to enforce desegregation in schools and public facilities - President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 into law, knowing it might cost him the next presidential election 6.8 When does Race Matter? Concept of stigma offers a framework to describe conditions under which race matters 6.8.1 Stigma - is an attribute that is deeply discrediting as it focuses everyone’s attention on one ‘tainted’ status and breaks the claims of other attributes the stigmatized might possess - Stigma can be physically evident (eg skin colour), or something not immediately evident (eg gender orientation) - Stigma dominates the interaction in a patterned or predictable way 6.8.2 Patterns of Mixed Contact - Mixed Contact - Interactions between stigmatized people and normal (people who possess no stigma) people - According to Goffman (1963), when normals and stigmatized interact, the stigma dominates the interaction in a patterned or predicted way 1. The very anticipation of contact can cause normal and stigmatized to avoid one another - One reason they avoid contact is to escape anticipated discomfort, rejection, disapproval and suspicion 36
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