can either serve as a guide when this is desired or can provide some other

Can either serve as a guide when this is desired or

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can either serve as a guide when this is desired or can provide some other means, such as a set course of study, for the student whose major desire is to be dependent. And, for the majority of students, the facilitator can help to use a particular individual’s own drives and purposes as the moving force behind his or her learning. 4. The facilitator endeavors to organize and make easily available the widest possible range of resources for learning. He or she strives to make available writings, materials, psychological aids, persons, equipment, trips, audiovisual aids—every conceivable resource that his or her students may wish to use for their own enhancement and for the fulfillment of their own purposes. 5. The facilitator regards himself or herself as a flexible
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resource to be used by the group. The facilitator does not downgrade himself or herself as a resource. He or she is available as a counselor, lecturer, and advisor, a person with experience in the field. The facilitator wishes to be used by individual students and by the group in ways that seem most meaningful to them insofar as he or she can be comfortable in operating in the ways they wish. 6. In responding to expressions in the classroom group, the facilitator accepts both intellectual content and the emotionalized attitudes, endeavoring to give each aspect the approximate degree of emphasis that it has for the individual or the group. Insofar as the facilitator can be genuine in doing so, he or she accepts rationalizations and intellectualizing, as well as deep and real personal feelings. 7. As the acceptant classroom climate becomes established, the facilitator is increasingly able to become a participant learner, a member of the group, expressing his or her views as those of one individual only. 8. The facilitator takes the initiative in sharing his or her feelings as well as thoughts with the group—in ways that do not demand or impose but represent simply the personal sharing that students may take or leave. Thus, the facilitator is free to express his or her own feelings in giving feedback to students, in reacting to them as individuals, and in sharing personal satisfactions or disappointments. In such
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expressions it is the facilitator’s owned attitudes that are shared, not judgments of evaluations of others. 9. Throughout the classroom experience, the facilitator remains alert to the expressions indicative of deep or strong feelings. These may be feelings of conflict, pain, and the like, which exist primarily within the individual. Here, the facilitator endeavors to understand these from the person’s point of view and to communicate his or her empathic understanding. On the other hand, the feelings may be those of anger, scorn, affection, rivalry, and the like—interpersonal attitudes among members of the group. Again, the facilitator is alert to these feelings, and by his or her acceptance of such tensions or bonds he or she helps to bring them into the open for constructive understanding and use by the group.
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  • Spring '19
  • Tom Pope

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