forward onto his eventual death Chanie himself too can become that scary figure

Forward onto his eventual death chanie himself too

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forward onto his eventual death, Chanie himself too can become that scary figure towards all those people who were responsible for the atrocities commited in these residential schools. Visual Effects and their meanings: The cold Blue/White tone throughout the film. The warm and cheery colours present during flashbacks or appearances of Chanie’s Father. The blue and white/grayish tones give off a very chilly, cut metal mood, which are always present when walking through the harsh wilderness Chanie has to navigate or when the film is on a scene featuring a residential school. These colours are not very welcoming and present a very cold, metallic touch, which at times feels like a forceful wiping of a slate until it is completely drained of colour or a sharp wind. This is intended and especially for the residential school parts as that is what Chanie feels all throughout the film, nothing but cold, harsh, unforgiving cuts that makes him depressed most likely. This blue/white colour scheme is indicative of that, just really giving off a sad and harsh mood which of course, all throughout the film as that is what Chanie mostly experiences. A cold reality that he is forced to live through which is what this blue, white, and greyish tones represent. These colours are a stark contrast of the reality Chanie has to go through, as in his flashbacks of when he was back home/with his father, he was happy, joyful and full of emotion which is what the fuzzy, bright yellow/light red colours showcase to us. Moreover, whenever he is reminded/thinks of his past life, before residential schools, we always see this cheery, welcoming colour palette displayed which gives off that feeling of warmth and joy. Sort of like a nostalgic effect which makes sense as well as whenever these colours come up, it is a bit hazy/fuzzy/washed out in the way that we know it is a past memory which Chanie holds dearly. Lastly, when Chanie’s father comes to him as most likely, a hallucination, he is comprised of that warm, welcoming collage of colours which embraces Chanie, making him feel that joy/happiness for a bit until reality take holds of him again, soaking Chanie in that miserable really
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pale blue, white, and gray colour palette. Lyrics: “I am the Stranger” “I know that she didn’t mean to hurt me but that’s what she did” “But I want to go back, if this is the end, I want to go back” The phrase is a very complex and deep set of lyrics but basically boils down to how Chanie is simply someone who is lost, a person lacking an identity and a being who if you knew before residential schools, would not know him now after his time there. These lyrics tell us that Chanie lacks an sort of persona, and that he is really just an unknown, like a blank slate in terms of identity which is most likely a result of the residential school system. This probably stripped him of all that made Chanie him, and washed it away, resulting in him being a stranger, someone who maybe Chanie doesn’t even recognize anymore due to his sheer
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  • Spring '16
  • Canadian Indian residential school system, chanIe

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