Late 19 th century urban immigrants identified in the

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Principles of Macroeconomics
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Chapter 21 / Exercise 5
Principles of Macroeconomics
Mankiw
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27. Late 19 th -century urban immigrants identified in the map above most commonly relied on support from a. nativists b the federal government c. the philanthropy of business leaders d. settlement houses “New York is, I firmly believe, the most charitable city in the world. Nowhere is there so eager a readiness to help. When it is known that the help is worthily wanted; nowhere are such armies of devoted workers, nowhere such abundance of means ready to the hand of those who know the need and how rightly to supply it. Its poverty, its slums, and its suffering are the result of unprecedented growth with the consequent disorder and crowding, and the common penalty of metropolitan greatness. The Day Nurseries, the numberless Kindergartens and charitable schools in the poor quarters, the Fresh Air Funds, the thousands and one charities that in one way or another reach the homes and the lives of the poor with sweetening touch Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives, 1890
28. Much of the urban reform described above was carried out by
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Chapter 21 / Exercise 5
Principles of Macroeconomics
Mankiw
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c. wealthy urban women who enjoyed abundant leisure time d. labor unions dedicated to addressing urban problems 29. Which 19 th -century reform movement was most closely associated with the activities described above?
30. Which 20 th -century group or program initially shifted reform efforts for urban poverty from local communities and cities to the federal government?
“Labor organizations are to-day the greatest menace to this Government that exists inside or outside the pale of our national domain. Their influence for disruption and disorganization of society is far more dangerous to the perpetuation of our Government in its purity and power than would be the hostile array on our borders of the army of the entire world combined. No one questions the right of labor to organize for any legitimate purpose, but when labor organizations degenerate into agencies of evil, inculcating theories dangerous to society and claiming rights and powers destructive to government, there should be no hesitancy in any quarter to check these evil tendencies even if the organizations themselves have to be placed under the ban of law.” N. F. Thompson, Testimony before the Industrial Commission on the Relations and Conditions of Capital and Labor, 1900

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