The first mesopotamian ruler who declared himself

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 4 pages.

N.“The first Mesopotamian ruler who declared himself divine was Naram-Sin of Akkad. Naram- Sin reigned sometime during the 23rd century BCE” and “According to his own inscription the people of the city of Akkad wished him to be the god of their city”. This self-proclaimed divineness was the bases for the creation of cult of Ishtar which was essential in unifying the empire of Mesopotamia. Throughout this paper I will show that societies, states, and empires in the pre-modern world were built and defined on not only the unifying factor of economic but also the unifying factor of religion.
Bibliography William H. Frederick Associate Professor of History, Ohio University, Athens. Author of Visions and Heat: the Making of the Indonesian Revolution and others. Nicole Brisch . Associate Professor, University of Copenhagen author of Religion and Power: Divine Kingship in the Ancient World and Beyond (2008, 2nd printing 2012). Maghan Keita is Associate Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies and Interim Director of the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies at Villanova University. His most recent work is the edited volume, Conceptualizing/Reconceptualizing Africa: the Construction of African Historical Identity (2002).
Reference Frederick, W. Visions and Heat: the Making of the Indonesian Revolution and others. Brisch, N. in press. The Priestess and the King: The Divine Kingship of Shu-Sin of Ur. Journal of the American Oriental Society. Keita, M. author of Riddling the Sphinx: Race, the Writing of History, and America's Culture Wars .

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture