Im fourteen years old and Ive been to forty two funerals Junior says Thats

Im fourteen years old and ive been to forty two

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9. "I'm fourteen years old and I've been to forty-two funerals," Junior says, "That's really the biggest difference between Indians and white people." In the community of Wellpinit, everyone is related, everyone is valued, everyone is at risk for an early death, and the loss of one person is a loss to the community. Compare Wellpinit to Reardan, whose residents have greater access to social services, health care, and wealth, and people are socially distanced from each other. How does Junior use this blunt, matter-of-fact statement to describe this vast gulph between an impoverished Indian community and a middle-class white town just a few miles away? 10. In many ways, Junior is engulphed by the emotional realities of his life and his community. Yet his spare, matter-of-fact langauge and his keen sense of irony help him to confront and negotiate the hurt, the rage, and the senselessness of Wellpinit's everyday realities. How does Junior use langauge to lead readers, whose lives may be very different from his own, to the kind of understanding that they will not get from young adult fiction whose writers do not have this kind of lived experience? 11. Cultural markers can be defined as the behaviors, speech patterns, ways of seeing the world, ethics, and principles that identify a person as belonging to a particular culture. WHen Rowdy and Junior play one-on-one at the end of the book--and they don't keep score--how is their friendship solidified by their deep knowing of who they are and what they come from?
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Literary Log Coping with Trauma Name: ___________________________ A lot of terrible things happen to Junior and his family in The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian . Arnold reacts to these events in a variety of ways. As you read, watch for some of these traumatic moments. As you find them, record three things in this journal: 1. A brief description of the traumatic event or situation 2. A specific quote from the book where Arnold reacts to this situation 3. Your analysis: what purpose does Arnold’s reaction serve? Why react in that way?
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POSSIBLE ASSESSMENTSStereotypesRead Rita Pyrillis’ essay “Sorry for not being a stereotype” (see the PRINT RESOURCES section). Choose one of the following prompts to write about: -Compare three points from her essay to three moments from Alexie’s novel. What common issues do both authors bring up? What differences do they have?-What does it mean to be an “invisible minority?” Use examples from both the essay and the novel to back up your argument.-Write your own essay about a time you were stereotyped -- OR a time that you were using stereotypes yourself, only to realize or learn about it later. Family IdentityIn 2003, Sherman Alexie was asked to contribute to the "Finding Our Families, Finding Ourselves" exhibition, a project of The Museum of Tolerance. The collection consists of recreations of parts of participants' childhood homes or other significant family locations and showcases the diversity of Americans' personal histories. The scenes explore the meaning and inspiration behind the places and objects where memories and family history were made.Ask your class to imagine that they have been asked to participate in such an exhibit. Have students draw or take photos/video of their home or another significant location and then write or record reflections that explain why this location is important to their family history and their personal identity.
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