Collect the items listed under materials using card

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Collect the items listed under Materials. • Using card stock, draw and cut out models of nets 1, 2, 4 and 6 as shown in the lesson plan. (Trace around the poster board shapes to make the nets.) Fold net 1 to make a tetrahedron. Tape the edges. Create student groups, with 3 to 4 students per group. Materials • 1 copy of the Net: A Word With Many Meanings worksheet on pages 176-177 for each student 1 roll of tape for each group 1 sheet of card stock for each student 1 pencil for each student 1 triangle, 1 rectangle and 1 square for each student (precut from lightweight poster board using the models below) for use as templates in making nets L E S S O N 2
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From NCAA Basketball Fast Break: Lessons Across the Curriculum With the NCAA, © 2003, NCAA. 174 Third Grade–Fifth Grade Math Background Information Basketball, tennis, volleyball and soccer all use different types of nets. We also use nets in mathematics. In math, a net is a pattern made by the edges of a hollow three- dimensional figure that has been opened along its edges and then flattened. A polyhe- dron is a three-dimensional figure with sides that are polygons. Polygons are closed two-dimensional shapes whose sides are straight lines (e.g., triangles, rectangles, squares and so on). The flat sides of a polyhedron are called faces; the sides of the polygons are edges; and the points where three or more edges meet are called vertices. This pattern made by all the flattened edges looks like a piece of fishing net. We will look at some nets and decide if they will fold to form a tetrahedron, a cube or a triangular prism. A tetrahedron is a polyhedron with four triangular faces. The faces of the tetrahedrons in this lesson are all equilateral triangles. A cube is a polyhe- dron with six square faces. A triangular prism is a polyhedron with two identical trian- gular faces that are parallel and three more rectangular faces. The worksheet contains pictures of a tetrahedron, a cube and a triangular prism. Introduce the Lesson Point out that a word can have many different meanings and that frequently these meanings are related. Brainstorm different meanings of the word net. Tell students that our goal is to understand the mathematical meaning of the word net. Follow These Steps 1. Hold up three polyhedrons: a tetrahedron, a prism and a cube. Point out the edges, faces and vertices. Hold up the tetrahedron and say you will reveal the net. Slit the tape holding the sides together; open the tetrahedron; and, using a marker, trace the edges and creases to show the net. Copy the net onto the chalkboard. Ask students to imagine the three outer triangles folding up to make the tetrahedron. Then fold the tetrahedron back together again as they watch. 2. Say that each polyhedron has many nets. Draw the following nets on the chalk- board and ask the students to decide which are actually the nets of a tetrahe- dron. Demonstrate how tracing around the poster board triangle makes it easy to produce good nets that can later be cut out and folded.
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