44 Sombric like horizons of the Nilgiris versus the African sombric horizons So

44 sombric like horizons of the nilgiris versus the

This preview shows page 21 - 23 out of 26 pages.

4.4 Sombric-like horizons of the Nilgiris versus the African sombric horizons So far, we have shown that one of the hypotheses proposed to account for the presence of sombric horizons in central Africa is consistent with the observations reported in the present study. In the Nilgiris, the dark subsurface horizons are the remnants of humification processes that have taken place under a former grassland vegetation. In Africa, the sombric horizons have many different facies (Frankart, 1983) and, as Van Wambeke (1992) observes, they occur in environments where their origin may be related to many different types of events. As far as we know, no analytical data similar to those discussed in this paper are available. Thus, we are certainly not in a position to extend our hypothesis to cover the whole African area where sombric horizons were reported to occur. However, we may underline coincidences. Beside similarities in terms of elevation and nature of the soil parent materials, there are now reports  (e.g. Bonnefille et al., 1990) indicating  that in Burundi, especially, the end of the Pleistocene was   also characterized by an important extension of the savanna at elevations that were more recently colonized by the montane forest. On the other hand, in an early paper by Ruhe (1956), a climatic and associated vegetation change was already suggested to be at the origin of the development of sombric horizons. Finally, there is another puzzling similarity. As is clearly the case in the Nilgiris and in Central Africa as well, the dark subsurface horizons frequently have chemical and physical properties similar to those that are presently recognized as soil andic properties (Neel, 1983; Buol and Eswaran, 1987; Mutwewingabo, 1989).
Image of page 21
5 Conclusion The soils of the Nilgiris showing the clearest colour contrast between their dark subsurface horizons and their brown top A horizons have recorded the vegetation changes that they experienced since the end of the Pleistocene in their organic matter. SOM of the dark subsurface horizons derives from the grassland vegetation that existed more than 10,000 years ago, whereas top soil OM have the  13 C signature of organic constituents deriving from the C3-type vegetation that replaced the grassland more recently. On the other hand, the different horizon colours observed, as well as the different origins of their organic matter, are also reflected in the chromatic and chemical properties of their humic acids. In depth, the humic acids belong to the A-type category of Kumada (1987) whereas, in the top A horizons, similar highly aromatic and dark humic acids are absent.
Image of page 22
Image of page 23

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 26 pages?

  • Spring '14
  • DanielKevles
  • The Land, Mercedes-Benz CL-Class, Humus, Howard Staunton

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes