In order to do fill the column with water the

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In order to do fill the column with water, the students should follow these steps: squeeze the bulb to pressurize the air inside, while keeping the bulb squeezed, open valve S , then release valve S . Next the student will release the bulb while opening valve A to re-inflate bulb, then release valve A. Then the student will repeat these steps until they reach the desired water level. In order to lower the water level in the column, the student will open valve E to allow the air in the reservoir to escape. In order to fine-tune the water level, the student when they are close to resonance, they can “hover” the water level up and down by a few millimeters to find the exact resonance. The student must make sure the bulb is full of air, then squeeze the bulb halfway while maintaining their “squeeze” on the bulb, open the S valve. While holding the S valve open, the student can change the water level by changing their “squeeze” on the bulb. The student will release valve S when they have the best resonance point. In the procedure and report the students must be cautious that they should only strike the tuning forks only with a rubber mallet or “ping” them with their fingers. This is done in order to avoid introducing overtones in the forks as well as to prevent damaging them. When determining the resonance, the student will listen for the tune with the lowest pitch, as overtones may be present. The source of sound (tuning fork) is to be held an inch above the open end of the vertical tube, which should be initially filled to the 10 cm mark with water. The water level is slowly lowered until the first resonance point is reached, as shown by an audible increase in intensity of sound. The height of the water should be recorded. Another caution for the students: the water level is now lowered further until the next resonance point is found, and the pipe length above the water is again noted. This procedure is continued until the tube is nearly out of water. The wavelength of the standing airwaves in the pipe can be found from this data, and the speed of the waves may be computed from this wavelength and the frequency of the tuning fork.
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For calculations the students will first determine the resonance points by measuring the corresponding tube lengths. The student should take care not to miss the first resonance, which occurs at a tube length of only a few centimeters. Then record the frequency of the sound source, the room temperature, and the current barometric pressure. Repeat this procedure for the second frequency. Next the students will plot tube lengths at resonance against the appropriate fractions as suggested above, and use the slope to find the wavelength of the airwaves in the tube. Next the student will find the end correction
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