He was then able to safely remove the gallbladder from the connections with the

He was then able to safely remove the gallbladder

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He was then able to safely remove the gallbladder from the connections with the cystic artery and cystic duct, and then carefully removed the gallbladder through the port. He went back and checked for hemostasis (hem/o (blood); stasis (stoppage of flow); stoppage or diminution of flow, as of blood or other body fluid, or of intestinal contents; -dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/stasis) and found that there was no bleeding. At this point, he closed the incisions that had been made after placing a drain to drain off any infectious material, blood, bile, etc. Note should be made that during the procedure, the surgeon irrigated copiously the abdominal cavity. The skin incisions were covered with dressing and the endotracheal tube was at this point removed and the patient began waking up. He was sent to the recovery area to fully awaken from anesthesia. The operating room staff did make counts of the surgical instruments and sponges used during the procedure to make sure none of them had been inadvertently left in the abdomen. B.Reviewing the operative report, identify some key diagnosis and organs investigated during the procedure.Cholecystectomy (cholecyst (gallbladder); ectomy (surgical removal of)Gallbladder (pear-shaped organ that stores and then concentrates bile)Cholecystitis (cholecyst (gallbladder); itis (inflammation)Cholelithiasis (chole (bile or gall); lithiasis (presence of stones)Hemostasis (hem/o (blood); stasis (stoppage of flow)Gangrenous (type of necrosis caused by a critically insufficiency blood supply)Liver (hepat/o) large organ located in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen that moves toxins from the blood and turns food into fuel and nutrients the body needs)Cystic artery (represents the main bloody supply to the gallbladder)Cystic duct (short duct that connects the gallbladder to the common bile duct) 2. Reviewing the outpatient encounter Benard Collins, accomplish the following and report in your findings and comments in your post.
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A. Go to Learn About a Test in the A.D.A.M. multimedia encyclopedia. Read all the information under Benign prostatic hypertrophy (hyperplasia) and look at the four images. View the video entitled Enlarged prostate gland . Look at Digital rectal exam in Clinical Illustrations (outside the encyclopedia on the ADAM home page). B. After studying the material, summarize or paraphrase any information that you use in response to the discussion questions this week. Be sure and cite your source appropriately . Do not copy and paste. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) protein produced by the prostate cells; done to help diagnose and follow prostate cancer in men; blood sample is needed; done every year to screen men from ages 55 to 69, if no risks are present; starting around age 40 to 45 if higher chance of developing prostate cancer or a family history of prostate cancer. Normal PSA level is considered to be 4.0 ng/ml A digital rectal examination is done to examine the lower rectum. The doctor uses a gloved, lubricated finger and insert this into the rectum. This test can be used to check the size of the prostate and to look for abnrmal bumps or other changes of the prostate gland.
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