Tried to improve Farmers Alliance 1870s Blamed Railroad Freight prices high

Tried to improve farmers alliance 1870s blamed

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Tried to improve: Farmer’s Alliance 1870s Blamed Railroad Freight prices, high interest rates, government fiscal policy (high tariffs) Formed co-ops to sell and market goods The People’s Party (1890s) Farmers/Knights of Labor/Greenbacks Included farmers and “produced” Biggest group…cotton farmers South and West Organized massive educational campaigns Demanded Federal Regulations of Railroad & Telegraph The Populist Platform — 1892 Direct election of Senators Government control of currency Graduated Income Tax Public financing for farmers Workers’ right to unionize Nationalize railroads to benefit farmers Populist Coalition The Government and Labor 1893 — Depression furthers divide 1894 — Coveys’ Army 1894 — The Pullman Strike
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Populism and Labor Urban and rural workers split Bryan and Free Silver “Cross of Gold Speech” The Campaign of 1896 Considered the 1st “modern election” Indian Wars In the late 1800s, California tried to attract immigrants by advertising its pleasant climate… I. Industrial and Agricultural Growth A. Corporate Agriculture B. Technological Innovations i. Bell's Telephone ii. Typewriters and Sewing Machines iii. Thomas Edison iv. George Westinghouse and Electric Power C. The Railroad Revolution i. Trains and Time ii. Trains and Industrial Era iii. The Downside of Railroad Boom D. Building Transcontinentals i. The "Work of Giants" ii. The Pacific Railway Act (1862) iii. Railroad Workers iv. Laying Track v. The Race to Finish II. The Rise of Big Business A. The Growth of Corporations B. Fighting Competition
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C. The Barons of Business i. John D. Rockefeller ii. Andrew Carnegie iii. J. Pierpont Morgan iv. Sears and Roebuck v. The Gospel of Wealth III. The Alliance of Business and Politics i. Republicans and Big Business ii. Laissez-Faire IV. An Industrial Society A. The Ways of Wealthy B. A Growing Middle Class i. Middle-Class Women ii. Neurasnia iii. Jane Addams iv. The Ladies' Home Journal C. The Working Class i. Working Women ii. Child Labor V. The "Dreadful Chill of Change" i. Organized Labor ii. The Molly Maguires iii. The Great Railroad Strike (1877) iv. The Sand-Lot Incident v. The National Labor Union vi. The Knights of Labor vii. Mor Jones viii. Anarchism ix. The Haymarket Riot (1886) x. A Backlash Against Unions xi. Gompers and AFL xii. The Homestead Steel Strike xiii. The Pullman Strike A. Economic Success and Excess I. The Myth of New South
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i. Textile Mills ii. The Tobacco Industry iii. Or New South Industries iv. The Redeemers II. The Failings of New South i. Sourn Poverty ii. The Crop-Lien System iii. Falling Cotton Prices III. Race Relations during 1890s i. Disfranchising African Americans ii. The Spread of Segregation iii. Mob Rule in North Carolina A. The Black Response i. Ida B. Wells ii. Booker T. Washington iii. W. E. B. Du Bois IV. The Settling of New West i. The Western Landscape ii. The Migratory Stream iii. The African American Migration iv. Western Mining v. Mining Boomtowns V. Life in New West i. The Cattle Boom
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