Consider PE foreign body aspiration anaphylaxis pneumothorax heart failure

Consider pe foreign body aspiration anaphylaxis

  • Walden University
  • N 6512
  • Test Prep
  • wrongwrong
  • 38
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depth, and can be caused by hypoxia, pain, fever, or anxiety. Consider PE, foreign body aspiration, anaphylaxis, pneumothorax, heart failure, asthma, or pneumonia* Bradypnea: Slower than 20 breaths per minutesSymptoms associated with intrathoracic infectionSymptoms associated with intrathoracic infection* Dyspnea * tachypnea * Pleuritic chest pain * Fever* Cough with green/rusty sputum* Chills * Anorexia * Malaise * Altered mental statusPercussion techniques when examining the lungs
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Percussion techniques when examining the lungs* Tap sharply and consistently from the wrist without excessive force* Compare all areas bilaterally using one side as a control for the other* Move systematically through posterior thorax, right lateral thorax, left lateral thorax,and anterior thorax* Have the patient sitting with head bent forward and arms folded. This moves scapulae laterally, exposing more of the lung* Have patient raise arms overhead to percuss the lateral and anterior chest.* For all positions percuss at 4-5 cm intervals over the intercostal spaces, moving systematically from superior to inferior and medial to lateralExamination findings when percussing the lungs Part 3 1. Examination of findings when percussing the lungs Tone type: i. Resonant Intensity-Loud Pitch- Low Duration-Long Quality- Hollow ii. Flat Intensity- Soft Pitch-High Duration-Short Quality-Very dull iii. Dull Intensity-Medium Pitch-Medium to high Duration- Medium Quality-Dull thud iv. Tympanic Intensity-loud Pitch- High Duration- Medium Quality-Drumlike v. Hyperresonant Intensity-Very loud Pitch-Very low Duration-Longer Quality- Booming Cardiac examination findings for a patient with rheumatic fever
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- May result in serious cardiac valvular involvement of mitral or aortic valve, then valves become stenotic and regurgitation. Children ages 5-15 are commonly affected. Patient may present with chest pain, palpitations, and shortness of breath. Objective findings upon examination include: Murmurs of mitral regurgitation and aortic insufficiency, cardiomegaly, friction rub of pericarditis, signs of congestive heart failure, and prolonged PR interval on ECG. Grading of heart murmurs 3. Grading of heart murmurs Grade I -Barely audible in a loud room Grade II -Quiet but not clearly audible Grade III -Moderately loud Grade IV -Loud, Associated with thrill Grade V -Very loud, thrill easily palpable Grade VI- Very loud, audible with stethoscope not in contact with chest, thrill palpable and visible Evaluation of ECG tracings Evaluation of ECG tracings (Seidel’s guide to physical examination 8th edition, p. 298) * ECG is a graphic record of electrical activity during a cardiac cycle. * ECG records depolarization (spread of stimulus through the heart muscle) and repolarization (return of stimulated heart muscle to a resting state. * Electrical activity is recorded in the ECG as specific waves; * P-Wave: First upward movement of ECG tracing. It is the spread of stimulus through the atria (atrial depolarization). It indicates that the atria are contracting and pumping blood into ventricles * PR interval: it is the time from the initial stimulus of the atria to the initial stimulation of the ventricles, usually 0.12 to 0.20
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