Thorough initial and recurring training on how to

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thorough initial and recurring training on how to recognize an impending stall situation and recover from it.By all accounts, Captain Renslow and First Officer Shaw were fine people. But they knew what to do, and yet did not do it. We cannot speculate on why they did not use theirtraining in dealing with the situation they faced. (James, 2010, para. 22-23)7
EVALUATING HUMAN FACTORSThe Colgan Air crash led to a couple of new regulations by the FAA and Congress. The FAA passed a final rule recommended by the NTSB that requires training (ground and flight) enablingpilots to prevent and/or recover from stalls, training for a more efficient way of pilot monitoring, and extended training on flying in crosswinds and wind gusts (Press Release – FAA Boosts, 2013). Congress also passed the 1,500 hour rule, which was not included in the NTSB’s recommendations, which states that commercial pilots must have at least 1,500 hours and an airline transport pilot (ATP) certificate; however, there are a few exceptions. Military pilots are only required to have 750 hours total time. Those who have obtained a Bachelor’s degree in aviation need 1,000 hours total time. Pilots with an Associate’s degree are required to have 1,250hours of total time (Press Release – Pilot Training, 2013). This regulation replaced the previous requirements of a commercial pilot license (CPL) and 250 hours total time. Under this new regulation, First Officer Rebecca Shaw would not have been eligible to be an airline pilot. I agree with the NTSB’s recommendations and support the 1,500 hour rule. After analyzing the accident report, it is apparent how crucial ongoing training is. I would also recommend more thorough checks before hiring pilots. Captain Renslow should not have been hiring without verification of a passed check ride. I would further recommend that failing more than one check ride in a 12-month period should result in probation until training is received and the check ride is passed. If the check ride is failed once more, that should result in automatic termination. FatigueThe biggest contributing factor to human error is fatigue. Pilot fatigue accounts for about 21 percent of aviation related incidents and 70 percent of fatal accidents in commercial aviation operations. Studies have shown that 71 to 90 percent of Norwegian, Swedish, and Danish pilots have admitted to making errors while fatigued, and over 50 percent admitted to falling asleep in the cockpit. A similar study done in Britain revealed that 31 percent of pilots who dozed off in 8
EVALUATING HUMAN FACTORSthe cockpit woke up to find the other pilot asleep (Allianz, 2014, p. 34). The FAA defines fatigueas “a condition characterized by increased discomfort by lessened capacity for work, reduced efficiency of accomplishment, loss of power or capacity to respond to stimulation, and is usually accompanied by a feeling of weariness and tiredness” (Federal Aviation Administration, n.d., p.

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