Deposition in which a forensic accountant serves a

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deposition in which a forensic accountant serves a fact witness or expert witness and all statements made by the involved parties are transcribed by the court reporter (Rufus, Miller, & Hahn, 2015). Another example may be an engaging attorney requesting a preliminary estimate from the forensic accountant concerning a business valuation (Rufus, Miller, & Hahn, 2015). Additionally, the client may also request an oral report during a fraud investigation [Ruf15]. References Rufus, R., Miller, L. S., & Hahn, W. (2015 ). Forensic Accounting. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Response #3 Hi Pamela, (& Martin) Great post! While the client may request an oral report for different reasons, it is important to keep in mind the potential risks associated with it. For example, the forensic accountant’s information relayed to the client may be misinterpreted or misunderstood and conveyed incorrectly to other involved parties, which is why it is vital to always have a written outline and memo documenting the information provided within the oral report (Rufus, Miller, & Hahn, 2015). Ultimately, this will protect the forensic accountant from any potential future harm whether reputational, legal, monetary, and so on. References Rufus, R., Miller, L. S., & Hahn, W. (2015 ). Forensic Accounting. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

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