Least ready of all three but most common n facility

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Least ready of all three, but most common n Facility with electrical power, Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) n Ready for equipment but no computer hardware on site. n Communications links may or may not be ready n Not considered adequate because of length of time for recovery n Advantages: n Cost Disadvantages: n False sense of security Multiple Centers n Processing spread over multiple centers, creating distributed redundancy. Can be in-house or through reciprocal agreement. n Cost is contained, but same issues as Mutual Aid Agreements (reciprocal agreement) Service Bureaus n Contract with service bureau to provide all alternate backup processing. n Advantage – quick response n Disadvantage – cost, resource contention during disaster Other alternatives: Rolling mobile backup sites n Vendor provides mobile services, mobile homes or flatbed trucks with power and HVAC sufficient for alternate processing. Considered Cold Site variation. In-house or external supply of hardware replacements n Vendors resupply hardware or internal stockpiling of critical components. n Subscription service with vendor for overnight shipping n May be OK for Warm site but not Hot site
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Prefabricated Buildings Use of prefabricated (mobile homes). Very cold site. Transaction Redundancy Implementations Fault tolerance and redundancy in Transaction processing n Electronic Vaulting – transfer of backup date to off-site location. Batch process through communication lines n Remote Journaling – parallel processing of transactions at remote site. Live data is posted as it occurs n Database Shadowing – live processing of remote journaling but creates more redundancy by duplicating the database sets Disaster Recovery Plan Maintenance n Disaster Recovery Plans often get out of date n Changes in technical infrastructure and company structure n Plan maintenance must be employed from the outset n Audit procedures should report regularly on the plan n Version control on all plan copies Testing of the Disaster Recovery Plan n Testing must be conducted in an orderly, standardized fashion, executed on a regular basis n No demonstrated recovery ability exists until it is tested n Testing verifies the accuracy of the recovery procedures n Testing prepares and trains personnel to execute during emergency n Testing verifies the processing capability of the alternate backup site Creating the Test Document Test document should include: n Test scenarios n Reasons for the test n Objectives of the test n Type of tests n Testing schedule n Duration of the test n Specific test steps n Who will be the participants n The task assignments of the test n Resources and services required n Test must not disrupt normal business functions n Testing should start with easy areas to build skills and confidence n Purpose is to find weaknesses, update and retest The Five Disaster Recovery Plan Types n Checklist n Structured walk through n Simulation n Parallel n Full-interruption Checklist n Preliminary step to real test, distribute plan for review by business unit managers Structured Walk Through n Business Unit Managers walk through the test plan.
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