Groundbreaking work but will also learn how one man

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groundbreaking work, but will also learn how one man dedicated and developed his skill and talents to bring about social reform . Erich Maria Remarque , All Quiet on the Western Front (Ballantine Books, 1987) All Quiet on the Western Front is the story of Paul Baumer, a young soldier who enlisted in the German army with youthful enthusiasm just before World War I, only to find himself destroyed by the brutality of trench warfare. His poignant tale is not a treatise on the inhumane nature of combat, but rather the story of one ordinary young man's life-changing experience. F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Scribner, 1999) In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write “something new something extraordinary and beautiful and simple, and intricately patterned.” That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby , arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald’s—and his country’s—most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. Gatsby’s rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream. It’s also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby’s quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair met five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means—and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy’s patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Questions You Might Ask Students Why did blacks put up with the Jim Crow laws? Why didn't they rebel or fight?
358 Were there any places where blacks were treated equally with whites? Why did parents allow their children to work in mines, sweatshops, etc.? What would be the dangers of having children work in factories today? Why were flappers considered "wild"? Why were soldiers called "doughboys"? What right was established by the 19th Amendment? Why did it take so long for women to get the vote? How did women fight for the right to vote? What rights did workers fight for in the late 1800s? (better working conditions; higher wages; insurance; shorter hours) Name the consumer goods Americans bought on credit in the 1920s (i.e. vacuum cleaners; washing machines; radios; other home appliances) What was life like during the time period? (Include education, family size, transportation, urbanization, and the role of women.) How did U.S. culture change as a result of industrialization, technology, and cultural diffusion?

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