Conversely the player does not want the disappointment of a bad hand of cards

Conversely the player does not want the

This preview shows page 7 - 9 out of 22 pages.

Conversely, the player does not want the disappointment of a bad hand of cards to show on his or her face, either. If the other players were to read her or his face and discern that the hand was weak, the player could no longer bluff them. Consequently, the successful poker player learns to neutralize all facial expressions and keep opponents confused. It is not only in poker games that we may wish to neutralize our facial expressions. In many circumstances, we may experience emotions, knowing that expressing them might not be in our best interests. Although we cannot usually avoid feeling negative emotions such as fear or anger, we often can prevent undesirable reactions from others by neutralizing our expression of those emotions. When our expressions are neutralized, others are unaware that we are experiencing any emotion. DEINTENSIFICATION . There are situations and social events that call for deintensification —that is, when we reduce the intensity of our facial expression of a particular emotion because circumstances require us to downplay how we truly feel. Usually, deintensification of expression occurs when we experience feelings that our culture has taught us are unacceptable. The British, as you may know, are well known for understating almost any emotion. In our culture, men are generally not permitted to express strong feelings of fear or sadness. At the funeral of a loved one, the American man is permitted to express some grief, but because he is expected to be strong for everyone else, he may deintensify those expressions to meet the expectations of his family members. People in controlling positions—such as managers, instructors, physicians, & clergy— often find themselves in situations where it would be most inappropriate to express their emotions to the true extent to which they are felt. A manager might be outraged at the behavior of a subordinate during a departmental meeting but recognizes that expressing those emotions in that setting would be counterproductive. After the meeting ends, the manager might express his or her concern in a controlled manner, & the subordinate appropriately reprimanded. However, if the manager expresses his or her actual feelings during the meeting, the employee might be publicly humiliated & embarrassed. This would not help the supervisor & employee to communicate with one another in future settings. The truly competent communicator knows what face to put forward in differing communication situations. Learning to control one’s expression of emotion takes caring, skill, and practice. Styles of Facial Expressions Based on these facial management techniques, researchers ( Ekman & Friesen, 1969a, 1969b ; Ekman, Friesen, & Ellsworth, 1972 ; Ekman, Friesen, & Tomkins, 1971 ) devised a classification of various styles of facial expressions. The techniques we’ve discussed are often used during a particular situation at a particular time. However, Ekman ( 1972 ) contends that some people display a certain style of
Image of page 7
expression consistently, no matter what the circumstances may be. The styles identified
Image of page 8
Image of page 9

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture