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Callimachus on Plato and Cleombrotus 147 epigrams by philosophers attest to interactions. And while Athens remained the center for philosophy, the intellectual climate in Alexandria also attracted a number of leading lights. Not least was the exiled Demetrius of Phaleron, who became Soter's confidant and guided his support of literary enterprise (Pfeiffer 1968: 96-104). Strato, before returning to Athens to administer the Lyceum after Theophrastus died,joined Philitas and Zenodotus as tutors of Philadel- phus in the 290s (Diog. Laert. 5.58). Even Theodorus the Cyrenaic served So- ter as an emissary in his negotiations with Lysimachus (2.102). Soter also ex- tended invitations to Stilpo (2.115), Theophrastus (5.37), and Zeno (7.24). None accepted, but the ruler's persistence indicates intense interest, whatever his motive. Another spur to this interest in philosophy was the project to organize the entire corpus of extant literature. Only scattered references to this immense laborsurvive, but they are enough to showthat Callimachus himself dealt with the philosophers. Those who composed verse, such as Parmenides (fr. 442) and Ion (fr. 449), naturally attracted his attention, not only as resources forhis own poetry (Ion in fr. 203, cf. frs. 242, 342; cf. Empedocles in fr. 553), but also for the challenge they posed to conventional categories (cf. Arist. Poet. 1). Callimachus was apparently familiar also with Socratic circles: he criticized the didascalic dating of Clouds (fr. 454);20 and Prodicus, whose pioneering lexi- cography had already excited Philitas (Pfeiffer 1968: 90-2, cf. 41-2), he not unreasonably labelled a rhetor rather than a philosopher (fr. 431), presumably because the sophist was bestknown for his declamations.21 Covering Platonic circles as well, Callimachus recorded that Eudoxus-a preeminent associate of Plato, an influential exponent of hedonism (Arist. NE 1172b9-20), and the greatest mathematician of his era-had studied with the Pythagorean Archytas (fr. 429).22 A work that required not only wide but close reading in philosophy is the monograph Callimachus devoted to the distinctive terminology and large 20Although Callimachus may not have known the difference, the Chaerephon whose work he catalogued in the pinakes (fr. 434) is probably not the famous admirer of Socrates (see Arethas' scholion on Ap. 20e) who appears in the Clouds as hisclosest associate (Dover1968: xxxiii, xcv-viii): the Socratic died before 399 (Ap. 21a),whereas the author was apparently a fourth- century parasite (Ath. 6.242f-44a) and dedicated his work to a relative of the orator Aeschines (Dem. 19.287, Ath. 6.242d). 21See Guthrie 222-5, 274-80. Prodicus also influenced Euhemerism (Henrichs 107-15), and perhaps even Hegesias, if the diatribe on human vicissitude recounted in the ps.-Platonic Axiochus reproduces a speech by Prodicus, as claimed (366c-69a).

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