and to find patterns and differences that might not be readily apparent by

And to find patterns and differences that might not

This preview shows page 19 - 22 out of 27 pages.

and to find patterns and differences that might not be readily apparent by simply counting amenities – several amenities can reveal the same value, just as one amenity can reveal several values. Table #3 lays out this broad analytic connection from the concept of scene to dimensions to sub-dimensions and back to determinate scenes.
Background image
Table #3: A Grammar of ScenesCONCEPT:DIMENSIONS:  SUB-DIMENSIONSSCENELEGITIMACYTHEATRICALITYAUTHENTICITYTRADITIONALISMSELF-EXPRESSIOCHARISMAUTILITARIANISMEGALITARIANISMNEIGHBORLINESSTRANSGRESSIONEXHIBITIONISMGLAMOURFORMALLOCALETHNICSTATECORPORATE--RATIONAL--CONSUMPTION TERRITORYCONSUMER ACTIVITYINTENTIONS, REASONS FOR ACTIONAPPEARANCE, MUTUAL SELF-DISPLAYIDENTITY, SELF-REALIZATION
Background image
Specific Scene = empirically discovered correlation or theoretically defined linkage amongsub-dimensions.  Example: sub-dimensions in red could combine as a bohemian scene.  For a list of 12 ideal-typical scenes we are studying, see [website]. Sub-dimensions in blue could combine as a communitarian scene [(--) indicates the negative version of the sub-dimensions: anti-rationality or anti-corporateness).Our grammar provides us with a language with which to move from local level analysesof cultural practices to more general patterns by which the meaning and impact of these practices can be compared and their relative impact on demographic change, political attitudes, and urban development can be studied.  In particular, we can use the languageprovided by this grammar to identify the more holistic combinations of values that are so key in making a scene.  For example, we can express (and thus measure) with our grammar the bohemian scene that grows from the example of Charles Baudelaire and lives on in places like Chicago’s Wicker Park (Lloyd 2005).  Such scenes fuse high levels of self-expressive individualism and transgressive threatricality together with moderate levels of exhibitionistic theatricality (think of Baudelaire’s dandy and flaneur) and a strong sense of anti-utilitarianism and anti-corporate values.  Similarly, we could use our grammar to identify communitarian scenes as those collections of amenities that promote a combination of traditional legitimacy, neighborly theatricality, local and perhaps ethnic authenticity, together with a strong mood of anti-transgressivism, anti-glamoursness and exhibitionism, and a moderate resistance to self-expressive and utilitarian individualism.  A more detailed description of 12 holistic scenes in which we 
Background image
Image of page 22

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture