Peter Mark Roget 1824 Thaumatrope 1825 Phenakistoscope Zoetrope 3 Photography

Peter mark roget 1824 thaumatrope 1825

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Peter Mark Roget, 1824 - Thaumatrope (1825), Phenakistoscope, Zoetrope 3. Photography - Joseph Nicephore Niepce, 1827 - Louis Daguerre (1839) announces Daguerretyping (photography) - William Henry Fox Talbot Series Photography 1. Eadweard Muybridge A) Motion experiments for Leland Stanford B) Success in 1878 C) Zoopraxiscope
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2. Etienne Jules Marey A) Chronophotographic Gun 3. Celluloid Roll Film A) Hannibal Goodman/George Eastman 1888 Kodak Camera Invention of the Movies I. The Edison Company - Thomas Edison/W.K.L Dickson “I want to do the same for the eye that the phonograph did for the ear…” A) The Kinetograph a. Electrically driven b. Huge and heavy (several hundred lbs) - At this time, Edison conceived a plan to combine the visual/moving image and sound, although it would be decades before it came to be B) “The Black Maria” a. West Orange, NJ b. Top of building opened up so actors could act under direct sunlight (no feasible lighting systems existed at the time) C) The Kinetoscope a. Continuous loop b. Peep-show device c. Only 1 viewer at a time d. Edison began renting them out to businesses and hotels for entertainment e. Kinetoscope Parlor II. The Lumiere Brothers (Auguste and Louis) A) The Cinematographe a. Hand-cranked – no need for power source whatsoever b. 3 functions – Camera, Projector, and printer c. began to send representatives out to take images from all over the world December 28 th , 1895 – First public showing for a paying audience – Grand Café in Paris III. Edison’s Vitascope – Jenkins and Armat A. Koster & Bial’s Music Hall (April 23 rd , 1896 in NYC) 1. Vaudeville Theatre First Motion Pictures 1 shot = 1 scene = 1 film Seeing The Movies I. Part of Vaudeville II. Amusement Parks and Traveling Shows III. Dime Museums IV. Importance of Projectionists a. Determined what was shown and order it was shown b. Single-shot films/Multi-shot films c. G.A Smith i. Two-shot movie
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Development of Narrative DEF: Narrative a series of cause and effect relationships occurring in time George Melies (1861-1938) - Interest in film started when he saw the Lumiere premiere in Paris. - Goes to Lumiere bros. and asks if they will lend him some of their film equipment so he can start to make films – they deny him, so he moves on - Milk cart – hearse - Trick Films o “Explosion Of A Motor Car” (1900) Cecil Hepworth o “A Trip To The Moon” (1902) 1 shot=1 scene=X scenes= 1 film - Melies’ lack of development Cinema of Attractions I. Old Paradigm a. Fiction vs. Non-Fiction II. New Paradigm a. Tom Gunning’s “Cinema of Attractions” “Cinema of Attractions” – Cinema based on one main quality, the ability to show something that will fascinate an audience Edwin S. Porter I. Porter’s Background a. Projectionist II. Editing Experiments a. “The Gay Shoe Clerk” (1903) III. Overlapping Editing “The Great Train Robbery” (1903) Early Wireless/Radio I. American Pioneers a. Lee De Forest i. Audion tube, 1906 ii. De Forest Wireless Telegraph Co.
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